Modafinil: is it ready for prime time?

Eric Prommer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Psychostimulants have been used to treat many symptoms associated with advanced cancer. The primary role of psychostimulants in such cases is the treatment of symptoms such as cancer-related fatigue, opioid-induced sedation, depression, and cognitive dysfunction associated with malignancies. These uses for psychostimulants came after approval for treatment of disorders such as attention deficit disorder. Modafinil, a new psychostimulant, is following a similar path after its approval for use in attention deficit disorder in 1998. Modafinil has been used to treat fatigue associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. It is now being increasingly used for cancer-related symptoms targeted by psychostimulants. Preliminary evidence from literature review suggests that modafinil is efficacious in improving opioid-induced sedation, cancer-related fatigue, and depression. There is no evidence to support its use in the treatment of cognitive dysfunction related to cancer or to support its having analgesic properties. Well-designed, randomized, controlled clinical trials are still needed to further elucidate the precise role of this drug in the care of patients with cancer. Specifically, large placebo-controlled trials with modafinil must be conducted in patients with cancer, with specific attention paid to pain control, depression, cognitive function, and adverse effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)130-136
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Opioid Management
Volume2
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neoplasms
Fatigue
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Depression
Opioid Analgesics
modafinil
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Cognition
Multiple Sclerosis
Analgesics
Patient Care
Therapeutics
Randomized Controlled Trials
Placebos
Pain
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Cognitive Dysfunction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Modafinil : is it ready for prime time? / Prommer, Eric.

In: Journal of Opioid Management, Vol. 2, No. 3, 05.2006, p. 130-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Prommer, E 2006, 'Modafinil: is it ready for prime time?', Journal of Opioid Management, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 130-136.
Prommer, Eric. / Modafinil : is it ready for prime time?. In: Journal of Opioid Management. 2006 ; Vol. 2, No. 3. pp. 130-136.
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