Mismatch of left ventricular function and infarct size demonstrated by technetium-99m isonitrile imaging after reperfusion therapy for acute myocardial infarction: Identification of myocardial stunning and hyperkinesia

Timothy F. Christian, Thomas Behrenbeck, Patricia Pellikka, Kenneth C. Huber, James H. Chesebro, Raymond J Gibbons

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Abstract

Quantitation of perfusion defect size using tomographic imaging with technetium-99m-hexakis-2-methoxy isobutyl isonitrile was performed at the time of hospital discharge in 32 patients with a first myocardial infarction who underwent successful coronary reperfusion within 8 h of the onset of chest pain. Reperfusion was accomplished with thrombolysis or primary coronary angioplasty. Radionuclide angiography was performed at discharge and 6 weeks later. There was a close correlation between perfusion defect size and values for ejection fraction and regional wall motion both at discharge (r = -0.80 and -0.75, respectively) and 6 weeks later (r = -0.81 and -0.81, respectively). There was no overall group difference in ejection fraction between the value at discharge and at 6 weeks; however, five patients had a significant increase (≥0.08) and six had a significant decrease (≥0.08) in ejection fraction. In patients with a significant increase at 6 weeks, ejection fraction was significantly lower at discharge than the value predicted from perfusion defect size (0.37 ± 0.09 measured versus 0.47 ± 0.13 predicted, p < 0.05) and it improved at 6 weeks to near predicted values (0.51 ± 0.07). In patients with a significant decrease at 6 weeks, ejection fraction was significantly higher at discharge than the value predicted from perfusion defect size (0.60 ± 0.10 measured versus 0.50 ± 0.10 predicted, p < 0.05) and it decreased at 6 weeks to near predicted levels (0.51 ± 0.09). Left ventricular ejection fraction at the time of hospital discharge is a potentially misleading index of the efficacy of reperfusion therapy for myocardial infarction. In a significant minority (34%) of patients this index does not accurately reflect perfusion defect size, apparently because of the effects of myocardial stunning and compensatory hyperkinesia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1632-1638
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume16
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990

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Myocardial Stunning
Hyperkinesis
Technetium
Left Ventricular Function
Reperfusion
Perfusion
Myocardial Infarction
Radionuclide Angiography
Therapeutics
Myocardial Reperfusion
Chest Pain
Angioplasty
Stroke Volume

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

@article{91b80e65839c4a5484768dc91c58ba41,
title = "Mismatch of left ventricular function and infarct size demonstrated by technetium-99m isonitrile imaging after reperfusion therapy for acute myocardial infarction: Identification of myocardial stunning and hyperkinesia",
abstract = "Quantitation of perfusion defect size using tomographic imaging with technetium-99m-hexakis-2-methoxy isobutyl isonitrile was performed at the time of hospital discharge in 32 patients with a first myocardial infarction who underwent successful coronary reperfusion within 8 h of the onset of chest pain. Reperfusion was accomplished with thrombolysis or primary coronary angioplasty. Radionuclide angiography was performed at discharge and 6 weeks later. There was a close correlation between perfusion defect size and values for ejection fraction and regional wall motion both at discharge (r = -0.80 and -0.75, respectively) and 6 weeks later (r = -0.81 and -0.81, respectively). There was no overall group difference in ejection fraction between the value at discharge and at 6 weeks; however, five patients had a significant increase (≥0.08) and six had a significant decrease (≥0.08) in ejection fraction. In patients with a significant increase at 6 weeks, ejection fraction was significantly lower at discharge than the value predicted from perfusion defect size (0.37 ± 0.09 measured versus 0.47 ± 0.13 predicted, p < 0.05) and it improved at 6 weeks to near predicted values (0.51 ± 0.07). In patients with a significant decrease at 6 weeks, ejection fraction was significantly higher at discharge than the value predicted from perfusion defect size (0.60 ± 0.10 measured versus 0.50 ± 0.10 predicted, p < 0.05) and it decreased at 6 weeks to near predicted levels (0.51 ± 0.09). Left ventricular ejection fraction at the time of hospital discharge is a potentially misleading index of the efficacy of reperfusion therapy for myocardial infarction. In a significant minority (34{\%}) of patients this index does not accurately reflect perfusion defect size, apparently because of the effects of myocardial stunning and compensatory hyperkinesia.",
author = "Christian, {Timothy F.} and Thomas Behrenbeck and Patricia Pellikka and Huber, {Kenneth C.} and Chesebro, {James H.} and Gibbons, {Raymond J}",
year = "1990",
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T1 - Mismatch of left ventricular function and infarct size demonstrated by technetium-99m isonitrile imaging after reperfusion therapy for acute myocardial infarction

T2 - Identification of myocardial stunning and hyperkinesia

AU - Christian, Timothy F.

AU - Behrenbeck, Thomas

AU - Pellikka, Patricia

AU - Huber, Kenneth C.

AU - Chesebro, James H.

AU - Gibbons, Raymond J

PY - 1990

Y1 - 1990

N2 - Quantitation of perfusion defect size using tomographic imaging with technetium-99m-hexakis-2-methoxy isobutyl isonitrile was performed at the time of hospital discharge in 32 patients with a first myocardial infarction who underwent successful coronary reperfusion within 8 h of the onset of chest pain. Reperfusion was accomplished with thrombolysis or primary coronary angioplasty. Radionuclide angiography was performed at discharge and 6 weeks later. There was a close correlation between perfusion defect size and values for ejection fraction and regional wall motion both at discharge (r = -0.80 and -0.75, respectively) and 6 weeks later (r = -0.81 and -0.81, respectively). There was no overall group difference in ejection fraction between the value at discharge and at 6 weeks; however, five patients had a significant increase (≥0.08) and six had a significant decrease (≥0.08) in ejection fraction. In patients with a significant increase at 6 weeks, ejection fraction was significantly lower at discharge than the value predicted from perfusion defect size (0.37 ± 0.09 measured versus 0.47 ± 0.13 predicted, p < 0.05) and it improved at 6 weeks to near predicted values (0.51 ± 0.07). In patients with a significant decrease at 6 weeks, ejection fraction was significantly higher at discharge than the value predicted from perfusion defect size (0.60 ± 0.10 measured versus 0.50 ± 0.10 predicted, p < 0.05) and it decreased at 6 weeks to near predicted levels (0.51 ± 0.09). Left ventricular ejection fraction at the time of hospital discharge is a potentially misleading index of the efficacy of reperfusion therapy for myocardial infarction. In a significant minority (34%) of patients this index does not accurately reflect perfusion defect size, apparently because of the effects of myocardial stunning and compensatory hyperkinesia.

AB - Quantitation of perfusion defect size using tomographic imaging with technetium-99m-hexakis-2-methoxy isobutyl isonitrile was performed at the time of hospital discharge in 32 patients with a first myocardial infarction who underwent successful coronary reperfusion within 8 h of the onset of chest pain. Reperfusion was accomplished with thrombolysis or primary coronary angioplasty. Radionuclide angiography was performed at discharge and 6 weeks later. There was a close correlation between perfusion defect size and values for ejection fraction and regional wall motion both at discharge (r = -0.80 and -0.75, respectively) and 6 weeks later (r = -0.81 and -0.81, respectively). There was no overall group difference in ejection fraction between the value at discharge and at 6 weeks; however, five patients had a significant increase (≥0.08) and six had a significant decrease (≥0.08) in ejection fraction. In patients with a significant increase at 6 weeks, ejection fraction was significantly lower at discharge than the value predicted from perfusion defect size (0.37 ± 0.09 measured versus 0.47 ± 0.13 predicted, p < 0.05) and it improved at 6 weeks to near predicted values (0.51 ± 0.07). In patients with a significant decrease at 6 weeks, ejection fraction was significantly higher at discharge than the value predicted from perfusion defect size (0.60 ± 0.10 measured versus 0.50 ± 0.10 predicted, p < 0.05) and it decreased at 6 weeks to near predicted levels (0.51 ± 0.09). Left ventricular ejection fraction at the time of hospital discharge is a potentially misleading index of the efficacy of reperfusion therapy for myocardial infarction. In a significant minority (34%) of patients this index does not accurately reflect perfusion defect size, apparently because of the effects of myocardial stunning and compensatory hyperkinesia.

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