Mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer disease in the community

Ronald C. Petersen, Paul Aisen, Bradley F. Boeve, Yonas E. Geda, Robert J. Ivnik, David S. Knopman, Michelle Mielke, Vernon S. Pankratz, Rosebud Roberts, Walter A. Rocca, Stephen Weigand, Michael Weiner, Heather Wiste, Clifford R. Jack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

148 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective The newly proposed National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association (NIA-AA) criteria for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer disease (AD) suggest a combination of clinical features and biomarker measures, but their performance in the community is not known. Methods The Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA) is a population-based longitudinal study of nondemented subjects in Olmsted County, Minnesota. A sample of 154 MCI subjects from the MCSA was compared to a sample of 58 amnestic MCI subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 1 (ADNI-1) to assess the applicability of the criteria in both settings and to assess their outcomes. Results Fourteen percent of MCSA and 16% of ADNI-1 of subjects were biomarker negative. In addition, 14% of MCSA and 12% of ADNI-1 subjects had evidence for amyloid deposition only, whereas 43% of MCSA and 55% of ADNI-1 subjects had evidence for amyloid deposition plus neurodegeneration (magnetic resonance imaging atrophy, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography hypometabolism, or both). However, a considerable number of subjects had biomarkers inconsistent with the proposed AD model; for example, 29% of MCSA subjects and 17% of ADNI-1 subjects had evidence for neurodegeneration without amyloid deposition. These subjects may not be on an AD pathway. Neurodegeneration appears to be a key factor in predicting progression relative to amyloid deposition alone. Interpretation The NIA-AA criteria apply to most MCI subjects in both the community and clinical trials settings; however, a sizeable proportion of subjects had conflicting biomarkers, which may be very important and need to be explored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-208
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of neurology
Volume74
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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