Middle school sexual harassment, violence and social networks

Elizabeth A. Mumford, Janet Okamoto, Bruce G. Taylor, Nan Stein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To pilot a study of social networks informing contextual analyses of sexual harassment and peer violence (SH/PV). Methods: Seventh and 8th grade students (N = 113) in an urban middle school were surveyed via a Web-based instrument. Results: Boys and girls reported SH/PV victimization and perpetration at comparable rates. The proportion of nominated friends who reported SH/PV outcomes was greater in boys' than in girls' social networks. Structural descriptors of social networks were not significant predictors of SH/PV outcomes. Conclusions: Collection of sensitive relationship data via a school-based Web survey is feasible. Full-scale studies and greater flexibility regarding the number of friendship nominations are recommended for subsequent investigations of potential sex differences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)769-779
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

Fingerprint

Sexual Harassment
sexual harassment
Sex Offenses
Violence
Social Support
social network
violence
Crime Victims
Sex Characteristics
victimization
friendship
flexibility
school grade
Students
school
student

Keywords

  • Peer violence
  • Perpetration
  • Sexual harassment
  • Social networks
  • Victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Middle school sexual harassment, violence and social networks. / Mumford, Elizabeth A.; Okamoto, Janet; Taylor, Bruce G.; Stein, Nan.

In: American Journal of Health Behavior, Vol. 37, No. 6, 11.2013, p. 769-779.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mumford, Elizabeth A. ; Okamoto, Janet ; Taylor, Bruce G. ; Stein, Nan. / Middle school sexual harassment, violence and social networks. In: American Journal of Health Behavior. 2013 ; Vol. 37, No. 6. pp. 769-779.
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