Microsatellite instability at selected tetranucleotide repeats is associated with p53 mutations in non-small cell lung cancer

Steven A. Ahrendt, P. Anthony Decker, Kara Doffek, Benny Wang, Lihua Xu, Michael J. Demeure, Jin Jen, David Sidransky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

88 Scopus citations

Abstract

Microsatellite alterations are useful clonal markers for the early detection of cancer. An increase in microsatellite instability has been observed at certain tetranucleotide repeat markers (AAAG(n)) in lung, head and neck, and bladder cancer. However, the genetic mechanism underlying these elevated microsatellite alterations at selected tetranucleotide repeat (EMAST) tumors is still unknown. The p53 gene plays an important role in maintaining genome integrity by repairing damaged DNA. Therefore, we tested 88 non-small cell lung cancers with a panel of 13 microsatellite markers previously shown to exhibit frequent instability and also performed p53 sequence analysis in these tumors. Thirty-one of these 88 cancers (35%) demonstrated a novel allele [EMAST(+)] in ≥1 of these 13 microsatellite markers, p53 mutations were detected in 50 of 88 (57%) cancers and were significantly (P = 0.001) more common in EMAST(+) tumors (25 of 31; 81%) than in EMAST(-) tumors (25 of 57; 44%). Among squamous cell cancers, p53 mutations were detected significantly (P = 0.04) more frequently in EMAST(+) tumors (17 of 19; 89%) than in EMAST(-) tumors (10 of 18; 55%). Similarly, among primary adenocarcinomas, p53 mutations were present in 67% of the EMAST(+) tumors and in 35% of EMAST(-) adenocarcinomas. None of the 31 EMAST(+) tumors demonstrated high frequency microsatellite instability when examined with a reference panel of five mono- and dinucleotide markers. Primary lung cancers with microsatellite alterations at selected tetranucleotide repeats have a high frequency of p53 mutations and do not display a phenotype consistent with defects in mismatch repair.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2488-2491
Number of pages4
JournalCancer research
Volume60
Issue number9
StatePublished - May 1 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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