Micromotion of plasma spray versus grit-blasted radial head prosthetic stem surfaces

Cholawish Chanlalit, James S. Fitzsimmons, Dave R. Shukla, Kai Nan An, Shawn W. O'Driscoll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Initial stability of a textured surface prosthetic stem is necessary for bone in-growth. Surfaces currently used for radial head prostheses include titanium plasma spray and grit-blasted titanium. Hypothesis: Plasma spray radial head prosthetic stems are less dependent than grit-blasted stems on a tight press fit. Good initial press-fit stability, with acceptable micro-motion, can be achieved with a greater range of stem sizes using a plasma spray than grit-blasted surface. Methods: Paired cadaveric radii were implanted with plasma spray or grit-blasted radial head prosthetic stems. Micromotion at the stem tip was measured under circumstances simulating eccentric loads. Results: Micromotion in the plasma spray (PS) stems (49 ± 37) μm was not better than that in the grit-blasted (GB) stems (28 ± 10) μm (P = .13). Micromotion of less than 100 μm was measured in all 12 GB stems that were maximum or 1 mm less than maximum size, versus 5/6, and 4/6 PS stems, respectively. Discussion: Micromotion in plasma spray prosthetic radial head stems was not better than that seen in grit-blasted stems, contrary to our initial hypothesis. Conclusion: Grit-blasted prosthetic radial head stems confer initial press-fit stability that is as good as, or slightly better than, corresponding plasma spray stems. Acceptable amounts of micromotion can be achieved with 2 grit-blasted stem sizes and probably with 2 plasma spray stem sizes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)717-722
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

Fingerprint

Titanium
Bone Development
Prostheses and Implants

Keywords

  • Basic Science
  • Biomechanical Laboratory Study
  • Elbow stability
  • Fracture
  • Grit blast stem
  • Radial head prosthesis
  • Titanium plasma spray

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Chanlalit, C., Fitzsimmons, J. S., Shukla, D. R., An, K. N., & O'Driscoll, S. W. (2011). Micromotion of plasma spray versus grit-blasted radial head prosthetic stem surfaces. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, 20(5), 717-722. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2010.11.010

Micromotion of plasma spray versus grit-blasted radial head prosthetic stem surfaces. / Chanlalit, Cholawish; Fitzsimmons, James S.; Shukla, Dave R.; An, Kai Nan; O'Driscoll, Shawn W.

In: Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, Vol. 20, No. 5, 07.2011, p. 717-722.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chanlalit, C, Fitzsimmons, JS, Shukla, DR, An, KN & O'Driscoll, SW 2011, 'Micromotion of plasma spray versus grit-blasted radial head prosthetic stem surfaces', Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, vol. 20, no. 5, pp. 717-722. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2010.11.010
Chanlalit, Cholawish ; Fitzsimmons, James S. ; Shukla, Dave R. ; An, Kai Nan ; O'Driscoll, Shawn W. / Micromotion of plasma spray versus grit-blasted radial head prosthetic stem surfaces. In: Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery. 2011 ; Vol. 20, No. 5. pp. 717-722.
@article{9471019140b84a32a66160306264ee83,
title = "Micromotion of plasma spray versus grit-blasted radial head prosthetic stem surfaces",
abstract = "Background: Initial stability of a textured surface prosthetic stem is necessary for bone in-growth. Surfaces currently used for radial head prostheses include titanium plasma spray and grit-blasted titanium. Hypothesis: Plasma spray radial head prosthetic stems are less dependent than grit-blasted stems on a tight press fit. Good initial press-fit stability, with acceptable micro-motion, can be achieved with a greater range of stem sizes using a plasma spray than grit-blasted surface. Methods: Paired cadaveric radii were implanted with plasma spray or grit-blasted radial head prosthetic stems. Micromotion at the stem tip was measured under circumstances simulating eccentric loads. Results: Micromotion in the plasma spray (PS) stems (49 ± 37) μm was not better than that in the grit-blasted (GB) stems (28 ± 10) μm (P = .13). Micromotion of less than 100 μm was measured in all 12 GB stems that were maximum or 1 mm less than maximum size, versus 5/6, and 4/6 PS stems, respectively. Discussion: Micromotion in plasma spray prosthetic radial head stems was not better than that seen in grit-blasted stems, contrary to our initial hypothesis. Conclusion: Grit-blasted prosthetic radial head stems confer initial press-fit stability that is as good as, or slightly better than, corresponding plasma spray stems. Acceptable amounts of micromotion can be achieved with 2 grit-blasted stem sizes and probably with 2 plasma spray stem sizes.",
keywords = "Basic Science, Biomechanical Laboratory Study, Elbow stability, Fracture, Grit blast stem, Radial head prosthesis, Titanium plasma spray",
author = "Cholawish Chanlalit and Fitzsimmons, {James S.} and Shukla, {Dave R.} and An, {Kai Nan} and O'Driscoll, {Shawn W.}",
year = "2011",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.jse.2010.11.010",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "717--722",
journal = "Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery",
issn = "1058-2746",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Micromotion of plasma spray versus grit-blasted radial head prosthetic stem surfaces

AU - Chanlalit, Cholawish

AU - Fitzsimmons, James S.

AU - Shukla, Dave R.

AU - An, Kai Nan

AU - O'Driscoll, Shawn W.

PY - 2011/7

Y1 - 2011/7

N2 - Background: Initial stability of a textured surface prosthetic stem is necessary for bone in-growth. Surfaces currently used for radial head prostheses include titanium plasma spray and grit-blasted titanium. Hypothesis: Plasma spray radial head prosthetic stems are less dependent than grit-blasted stems on a tight press fit. Good initial press-fit stability, with acceptable micro-motion, can be achieved with a greater range of stem sizes using a plasma spray than grit-blasted surface. Methods: Paired cadaveric radii were implanted with plasma spray or grit-blasted radial head prosthetic stems. Micromotion at the stem tip was measured under circumstances simulating eccentric loads. Results: Micromotion in the plasma spray (PS) stems (49 ± 37) μm was not better than that in the grit-blasted (GB) stems (28 ± 10) μm (P = .13). Micromotion of less than 100 μm was measured in all 12 GB stems that were maximum or 1 mm less than maximum size, versus 5/6, and 4/6 PS stems, respectively. Discussion: Micromotion in plasma spray prosthetic radial head stems was not better than that seen in grit-blasted stems, contrary to our initial hypothesis. Conclusion: Grit-blasted prosthetic radial head stems confer initial press-fit stability that is as good as, or slightly better than, corresponding plasma spray stems. Acceptable amounts of micromotion can be achieved with 2 grit-blasted stem sizes and probably with 2 plasma spray stem sizes.

AB - Background: Initial stability of a textured surface prosthetic stem is necessary for bone in-growth. Surfaces currently used for radial head prostheses include titanium plasma spray and grit-blasted titanium. Hypothesis: Plasma spray radial head prosthetic stems are less dependent than grit-blasted stems on a tight press fit. Good initial press-fit stability, with acceptable micro-motion, can be achieved with a greater range of stem sizes using a plasma spray than grit-blasted surface. Methods: Paired cadaveric radii were implanted with plasma spray or grit-blasted radial head prosthetic stems. Micromotion at the stem tip was measured under circumstances simulating eccentric loads. Results: Micromotion in the plasma spray (PS) stems (49 ± 37) μm was not better than that in the grit-blasted (GB) stems (28 ± 10) μm (P = .13). Micromotion of less than 100 μm was measured in all 12 GB stems that were maximum or 1 mm less than maximum size, versus 5/6, and 4/6 PS stems, respectively. Discussion: Micromotion in plasma spray prosthetic radial head stems was not better than that seen in grit-blasted stems, contrary to our initial hypothesis. Conclusion: Grit-blasted prosthetic radial head stems confer initial press-fit stability that is as good as, or slightly better than, corresponding plasma spray stems. Acceptable amounts of micromotion can be achieved with 2 grit-blasted stem sizes and probably with 2 plasma spray stem sizes.

KW - Basic Science

KW - Biomechanical Laboratory Study

KW - Elbow stability

KW - Fracture

KW - Grit blast stem

KW - Radial head prosthesis

KW - Titanium plasma spray

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79958825215&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79958825215&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jse.2010.11.010

DO - 10.1016/j.jse.2010.11.010

M3 - Article

C2 - 21324417

AN - SCOPUS:79958825215

VL - 20

SP - 717

EP - 722

JO - Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

JF - Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

SN - 1058-2746

IS - 5

ER -