Metabolism of triacetin-derived acetate in dogs

B. Bleiberg, T. R. Beers, M. Persson, J. M. Miles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Triacetin is a water-soluble triglyceride that may have a role as a parenteral nutrient. In the present study triacetin was administered intravenously to mongrel dogs (n = 10) 2 wk after surgical placement of blood-sampling catheters in the aorta and in the portal, hepatic, renal, and femoral veins. [1-14C]Acetate was infused to allow quantification of organ uptake of acetate as well as systemic turnover and oxidation. Systemic acetate turnover accounted for ≃70% of triacetin-derived acetate, assuming complete hydrolysis of the triglyceride. Approximately 80% of systemic acetate uptake was rapidly oxidized. Significant acetate uptake was demonstrated in all tissues (liver, 559 ± 68; intestine, 342 ± 23; hindlimb, 89 ± 7; and kidney, 330 ± 37 μmol/min). In conclusion, during intravenous administration in dogs, the majority of infused triacetin undergoes intravascular hydrolysis, and the majority of the resulting acetate is oxidized. Thus, energy in the form of short-chain fatty acids can be delivered to a resting gut via intravenous infusion of a short-chain triglyceride.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)908-911
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume58
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1993

Fingerprint

Triacetin
triacetin
Acetates
acetates
Dogs
metabolism
dogs
Triglycerides
triacylglycerols
uptake mechanisms
Hydrolysis
hydrolysis
kidneys
liver
Renal Veins
Hepatic Veins
Femoral Vein
Volatile Fatty Acids
blood sampling
short chain fatty acids

Keywords

  • lipid metabolism
  • parenteral nutrition
  • Short-chain triglycerides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Bleiberg, B., Beers, T. R., Persson, M., & Miles, J. M. (1993). Metabolism of triacetin-derived acetate in dogs. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 58(6), 908-911.

Metabolism of triacetin-derived acetate in dogs. / Bleiberg, B.; Beers, T. R.; Persson, M.; Miles, J. M.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 58, No. 6, 1993, p. 908-911.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bleiberg, B, Beers, TR, Persson, M & Miles, JM 1993, 'Metabolism of triacetin-derived acetate in dogs', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 58, no. 6, pp. 908-911.
Bleiberg B, Beers TR, Persson M, Miles JM. Metabolism of triacetin-derived acetate in dogs. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1993;58(6):908-911.
Bleiberg, B. ; Beers, T. R. ; Persson, M. ; Miles, J. M. / Metabolism of triacetin-derived acetate in dogs. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1993 ; Vol. 58, No. 6. pp. 908-911.
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