Mesenchymal stem cells for bone repair and metabolic bone diseases

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

130 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human mesenchymal stem cells offer a potential alternative to embryonic stem cells in clinical applications. The ability of these cells to self-renew and differentiate into multiple tissues, including bone, cartilage, fat, and other tissues of mesenchymal origin, makes them an attractive candidate for clinical applications. Patients who experience fracture nonunion and metabolic bone diseases, such as osteogenesis imperfecta and hypophosphatasia, have benefited from human mesenchymal stem cell therapy. Because of their ability to modulate immune responses, allogeneic transplant of these cells may be feasible without a substantial risk of immune rejection. The field of regenerative medicine is still facing considerable challenges; however, with the progress achieved thus far, the promise of stem cell therapy as a viable option for fracture nonunion and metabolic bone diseases is closer to reality. In this review, we update the biology and clinical applicability of human mesenchymal stem cells for bone repair and metabolic bone diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)893-902
Number of pages10
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume84
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Metabolic Bone Diseases
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Bone and Bones
Hypophosphatasia
Osteogenesis Imperfecta
Regenerative Medicine
Embryonic Stem Cells
Cartilage
Stem Cells
Fats
Transplants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Mesenchymal stem cells for bone repair and metabolic bone diseases. / Undale, Anita H.; Westendorf, Jennifer J; Yaszemski, Michael J; Khosla, Sundeep.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 84, No. 10, 2009, p. 893-902.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{77b2895db4774469ba138b3d7638f0f0,
title = "Mesenchymal stem cells for bone repair and metabolic bone diseases",
abstract = "Human mesenchymal stem cells offer a potential alternative to embryonic stem cells in clinical applications. The ability of these cells to self-renew and differentiate into multiple tissues, including bone, cartilage, fat, and other tissues of mesenchymal origin, makes them an attractive candidate for clinical applications. Patients who experience fracture nonunion and metabolic bone diseases, such as osteogenesis imperfecta and hypophosphatasia, have benefited from human mesenchymal stem cell therapy. Because of their ability to modulate immune responses, allogeneic transplant of these cells may be feasible without a substantial risk of immune rejection. The field of regenerative medicine is still facing considerable challenges; however, with the progress achieved thus far, the promise of stem cell therapy as a viable option for fracture nonunion and metabolic bone diseases is closer to reality. In this review, we update the biology and clinical applicability of human mesenchymal stem cells for bone repair and metabolic bone diseases.",
author = "Undale, {Anita H.} and Westendorf, {Jennifer J} and Yaszemski, {Michael J} and Sundeep Khosla",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.4065/84.10.893",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "84",
pages = "893--902",
journal = "Mayo Clinic Proceedings",
issn = "0025-6196",
publisher = "Elsevier Science",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mesenchymal stem cells for bone repair and metabolic bone diseases

AU - Undale, Anita H.

AU - Westendorf, Jennifer J

AU - Yaszemski, Michael J

AU - Khosla, Sundeep

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Human mesenchymal stem cells offer a potential alternative to embryonic stem cells in clinical applications. The ability of these cells to self-renew and differentiate into multiple tissues, including bone, cartilage, fat, and other tissues of mesenchymal origin, makes them an attractive candidate for clinical applications. Patients who experience fracture nonunion and metabolic bone diseases, such as osteogenesis imperfecta and hypophosphatasia, have benefited from human mesenchymal stem cell therapy. Because of their ability to modulate immune responses, allogeneic transplant of these cells may be feasible without a substantial risk of immune rejection. The field of regenerative medicine is still facing considerable challenges; however, with the progress achieved thus far, the promise of stem cell therapy as a viable option for fracture nonunion and metabolic bone diseases is closer to reality. In this review, we update the biology and clinical applicability of human mesenchymal stem cells for bone repair and metabolic bone diseases.

AB - Human mesenchymal stem cells offer a potential alternative to embryonic stem cells in clinical applications. The ability of these cells to self-renew and differentiate into multiple tissues, including bone, cartilage, fat, and other tissues of mesenchymal origin, makes them an attractive candidate for clinical applications. Patients who experience fracture nonunion and metabolic bone diseases, such as osteogenesis imperfecta and hypophosphatasia, have benefited from human mesenchymal stem cell therapy. Because of their ability to modulate immune responses, allogeneic transplant of these cells may be feasible without a substantial risk of immune rejection. The field of regenerative medicine is still facing considerable challenges; however, with the progress achieved thus far, the promise of stem cell therapy as a viable option for fracture nonunion and metabolic bone diseases is closer to reality. In this review, we update the biology and clinical applicability of human mesenchymal stem cells for bone repair and metabolic bone diseases.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=70350212674&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=70350212674&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4065/84.10.893

DO - 10.4065/84.10.893

M3 - Article

C2 - 19797778

AN - SCOPUS:70350212674

VL - 84

SP - 893

EP - 902

JO - Mayo Clinic Proceedings

JF - Mayo Clinic Proceedings

SN - 0025-6196

IS - 10

ER -