Meeting the Challenges of Myocarditis: New Opportunities for Prevention, Detection, and Intervention—A Report from the 2021 National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Workshop

on behalf of the Workshop Speakers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) convened a workshop of international experts to discuss new research opportunities for the prevention, detection, and intervention of myocarditis in May 2021. These experts reviewed the current state of science and identified key gaps and opportunities in basic, diagnostic, translational, and therapeutic frontiers to guide future research in myocarditis. In addition to addressing community-acquired myocarditis, the workshop also focused on emerging causes of myocarditis including immune checkpoint inhibitors and SARS-CoV-2 related myocardial injuries and considered the use of systems biology and artificial intelligence methodologies to define workflows to identify novel mechanisms of disease and new therapeutic targets. A new priority is the investigation of the relationship between social determinants of health (SDoH), including race and economic status, and inflammatory response and outcomes in myocarditis. The result is a proposal for the reclassification of myocarditis that integrates the latest knowledge of immunological pathogenesis to refine estimates of prognosis and target pathway-specific treatments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number5721
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume11
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2022

Keywords

  • cardiac magnetic resonance
  • cytokines
  • dilated cardiomyopathy
  • heart biopsy
  • heart failure
  • lymphocytes
  • macrophages
  • myocarditis
  • NHLBI workshop in myocarditis
  • viral myocarditis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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