Medical therapies for heavy menstrual bleeding in women with uterine fibroids: a retrospective analysis of a large commercially insured population in the USA

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To report patterns and patient characteristics associated with initiation of and persistence with medical therapies for uterine fibroid-related heavy menstrual bleeding. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting: US commercial insurance claims database. Population: 41 561 women aged 18–54 years with uterine fibroids and heavy menstrual bleeding who initiated medical therapies from January 2000 through December 2013. Method: Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess patient characteristics associated with initiation and persistence. Cox proportional hazards regression was used on propensity score-matched cohorts to examine change from index medication. Main outcomes measures: Initiation of and persistence with four first-line medical therapies: short- and long-acting reversible contraceptive steroids, leuprolide acetate, and tranexamic acid. Results: Most women (79.4%) took short-acting reversible contraceptive steroids as first-line therapy (index medication), whereas 9.5%, 8.5%, and 2.7% used long-acting reversible contraceptive steroids, leuprolide acetate, and tranexamic acid, respectively. During follow-up, 16 594 women (39.9%) switched to nonindex medication (18.4%) or procedural treatment (81.6%). In comparison with women taking short-acting steroids, those receiving long-acting steroids were less likely to switch [hazard ratio (HR) 0.84, 95% CI 0.79–0.91], whereas women taking leuprolide acetate (HR 2.44, 95% CI 2.27–2.62) or tranexamic acid (HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.26–1.65) were more likely to switch. Older age, emergency department visits, anaemia, and inflammatory disease diagnoses at baseline were associated with increased probability of discontinuing the index medication or switching to another therapy. Conclusions: Women with uterine fibroid-related heavy menstrual bleeding were more likely to persist with their initial therapy of long-acting reversible contraceptive steroid compared with other medical options. Tweetable Abstract: 80% women with fibroid-related heavy menstrual bleeding use SARC, but LARC users are more persistent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)322-330
Number of pages9
JournalBJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Volume124
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Keywords

  • Heavy menstrual bleeding
  • leuprolide acetate
  • long-acting reversible contraceptive steroid
  • short-acting reversible contraceptive steroid
  • tranexamic acid
  • uterine fibroids or leiomyomas

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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