Medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors for sporadic Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia

The InterLymph non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes project

Sam M. Mbulaiteye, Lindsay M. Morton, Joshua N. Sampson, Ellen T. Chang, Laura Costas, Silvia de Sanjosé, Tracy Lightfoot, Jennifer Kelly, Jonathan W. Friedberg, Wendy Cozen, Rafael Marcos-Gragera, Susan L Slager, Brenda M. Birmann, Dennis D. Weisenburger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The etiologic role of medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors in sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is unknown, but epidemiologic and clinical evidence suggests that risk factors may vary by age. Methods: We investigated risk factors for sporadic BL in 295 cases compared with 21 818 controls in a pooled analysis of 18 case-control studies in the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph). Cases were defined to include typical BL or Burkitt-like lymphoma. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations were calculated separately for younger (<50 years) and older (≥50 years) BL using multivariate logistic regression. Results: Cases included 133 younger BL and 159 older BL (age was missing for three cases) and they were evenly split between typical BL (n = 147) and Burkitt-like lymphoma (n = 148). BL in younger participants was inversely associated with a history of allergy (OR = 0.58; 95% CI = 0.32 to 1.05), and positively associated with a history of eczema among individuals without other atopic conditions (OR = 2.54; 95% CI = 1.20 to 5.40), taller height (OR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.08 to 4.36), and employment as a cleaner (OR = 3.49; 95% CI = 1.13 to 10.7). BL in older participants was associated with a history of hepatitis C virus seropositivity (OR = 4.19; 95% CI = 1.05 to 16.6) based on three exposed cases. Regardless of age, BL was inversely associated with alcohol consumption and positively associated with height. Conclusions: Our data suggest that BL in younger and older adults may be etiologically distinct.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)106-114
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute - Monographs
Issue number48
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Medical History Taking
Burkitt Lymphoma
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Life Style
Lymphoma
Epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Eczema

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors for sporadic Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia : The InterLymph non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes project. / Mbulaiteye, Sam M.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Chang, Ellen T.; Costas, Laura; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Lightfoot, Tracy; Kelly, Jennifer; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Cozen, Wendy; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Slager, Susan L; Birmann, Brenda M.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.

In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute - Monographs, No. 48, 2014, p. 106-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mbulaiteye, SM, Morton, LM, Sampson, JN, Chang, ET, Costas, L, de Sanjosé, S, Lightfoot, T, Kelly, J, Friedberg, JW, Cozen, W, Marcos-Gragera, R, Slager, SL, Birmann, BM & Weisenburger, DD 2014, 'Medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors for sporadic Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia: The InterLymph non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes project', Journal of the National Cancer Institute - Monographs, no. 48, pp. 106-114. https://doi.org/10.1093/jncimonographs/lgu003
Mbulaiteye, Sam M. ; Morton, Lindsay M. ; Sampson, Joshua N. ; Chang, Ellen T. ; Costas, Laura ; de Sanjosé, Silvia ; Lightfoot, Tracy ; Kelly, Jennifer ; Friedberg, Jonathan W. ; Cozen, Wendy ; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael ; Slager, Susan L ; Birmann, Brenda M. ; Weisenburger, Dennis D. / Medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors for sporadic Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia : The InterLymph non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes project. In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute - Monographs. 2014 ; No. 48. pp. 106-114.
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abstract = "Background: The etiologic role of medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors in sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is unknown, but epidemiologic and clinical evidence suggests that risk factors may vary by age. Methods: We investigated risk factors for sporadic BL in 295 cases compared with 21 818 controls in a pooled analysis of 18 case-control studies in the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph). Cases were defined to include typical BL or Burkitt-like lymphoma. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs) for associations were calculated separately for younger (<50 years) and older (≥50 years) BL using multivariate logistic regression. Results: Cases included 133 younger BL and 159 older BL (age was missing for three cases) and they were evenly split between typical BL (n = 147) and Burkitt-like lymphoma (n = 148). BL in younger participants was inversely associated with a history of allergy (OR = 0.58; 95{\%} CI = 0.32 to 1.05), and positively associated with a history of eczema among individuals without other atopic conditions (OR = 2.54; 95{\%} CI = 1.20 to 5.40), taller height (OR = 2.17; 95{\%} CI = 1.08 to 4.36), and employment as a cleaner (OR = 3.49; 95{\%} CI = 1.13 to 10.7). BL in older participants was associated with a history of hepatitis C virus seropositivity (OR = 4.19; 95{\%} CI = 1.05 to 16.6) based on three exposed cases. Regardless of age, BL was inversely associated with alcohol consumption and positively associated with height. Conclusions: Our data suggest that BL in younger and older adults may be etiologically distinct.",
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T1 - Medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors for sporadic Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia

T2 - The InterLymph non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes project

AU - Mbulaiteye, Sam M.

AU - Morton, Lindsay M.

AU - Sampson, Joshua N.

AU - Chang, Ellen T.

AU - Costas, Laura

AU - de Sanjosé, Silvia

AU - Lightfoot, Tracy

AU - Kelly, Jennifer

AU - Friedberg, Jonathan W.

AU - Cozen, Wendy

AU - Marcos-Gragera, Rafael

AU - Slager, Susan L

AU - Birmann, Brenda M.

AU - Weisenburger, Dennis D.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Background: The etiologic role of medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors in sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is unknown, but epidemiologic and clinical evidence suggests that risk factors may vary by age. Methods: We investigated risk factors for sporadic BL in 295 cases compared with 21 818 controls in a pooled analysis of 18 case-control studies in the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph). Cases were defined to include typical BL or Burkitt-like lymphoma. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations were calculated separately for younger (<50 years) and older (≥50 years) BL using multivariate logistic regression. Results: Cases included 133 younger BL and 159 older BL (age was missing for three cases) and they were evenly split between typical BL (n = 147) and Burkitt-like lymphoma (n = 148). BL in younger participants was inversely associated with a history of allergy (OR = 0.58; 95% CI = 0.32 to 1.05), and positively associated with a history of eczema among individuals without other atopic conditions (OR = 2.54; 95% CI = 1.20 to 5.40), taller height (OR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.08 to 4.36), and employment as a cleaner (OR = 3.49; 95% CI = 1.13 to 10.7). BL in older participants was associated with a history of hepatitis C virus seropositivity (OR = 4.19; 95% CI = 1.05 to 16.6) based on three exposed cases. Regardless of age, BL was inversely associated with alcohol consumption and positively associated with height. Conclusions: Our data suggest that BL in younger and older adults may be etiologically distinct.

AB - Background: The etiologic role of medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors in sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is unknown, but epidemiologic and clinical evidence suggests that risk factors may vary by age. Methods: We investigated risk factors for sporadic BL in 295 cases compared with 21 818 controls in a pooled analysis of 18 case-control studies in the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph). Cases were defined to include typical BL or Burkitt-like lymphoma. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations were calculated separately for younger (<50 years) and older (≥50 years) BL using multivariate logistic regression. Results: Cases included 133 younger BL and 159 older BL (age was missing for three cases) and they were evenly split between typical BL (n = 147) and Burkitt-like lymphoma (n = 148). BL in younger participants was inversely associated with a history of allergy (OR = 0.58; 95% CI = 0.32 to 1.05), and positively associated with a history of eczema among individuals without other atopic conditions (OR = 2.54; 95% CI = 1.20 to 5.40), taller height (OR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.08 to 4.36), and employment as a cleaner (OR = 3.49; 95% CI = 1.13 to 10.7). BL in older participants was associated with a history of hepatitis C virus seropositivity (OR = 4.19; 95% CI = 1.05 to 16.6) based on three exposed cases. Regardless of age, BL was inversely associated with alcohol consumption and positively associated with height. Conclusions: Our data suggest that BL in younger and older adults may be etiologically distinct.

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