Medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors for mantle cell lymphoma: The interlymph non-hodgkin lymphoma subtypes project

Karin E. Smedby, Joshua N. Sampson, Jennifer J. Turner, Susan L. Slager, Marc Maynadié, Eve Roman, Thomas M. Habermann, Christopher R. Flowers, Sonja I. Berndt, Paige M. Bracci, Henrik Hjalgrim, Dennis D. Weisenburger, Lindsay M. Morton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The etiology of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), a distinctive subtype accounting for 2%-10% of all non-Hodgkin lymphoma, is not known. Methods: We investigated associations with self-reported medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors in a pooled analysis of 557 patients with MCL and 13 766 controls from 13 case-control studies in Europe, North America, and Australia. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) associated with each exposure were examined using multivariate logistic regression models. Results: The median age of the MCL patients was 62 years and 76% were men. Risk of MCL was inversely associated with history of hay fever (OR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.48 to 0.82), and the association was independent of other atopic diseases and allergies. A hematological malignancy among first-degree relatives was associated with a twofold increased risk of MCL (OR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.39 to 2.84), which was stronger in men (OR = 2.21, 95% CI = 1.44 to 3.38) than women (OR = 1.61, 95% CI = 0.82 to 3.19). A modestly increased risk of MCL was also observed in association with ever having lived on a farm (OR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.03 to 1.90). Unlike some other non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes, MCL risk was not statistically significantly associated with autoimmune disorders, tobacco smoking, alcohol intake, body mass index, or ultraviolet radiation. Conclusions: The novel observations of a possible role for atopy and allergy and farm life in risk of MCL, together with confirmatory evidence of a familial link, suggest a multifactorial etiology of immune-related environmental exposures and genetic susceptibility. These findings provide guidance for future research in MCL etiology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)76-86
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute - Monographs
Issue number48
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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