Medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors for peripheral T-cell lymphomas: The interlymph non-hodgkin lymphoma subtypes project

Sophia S. Wang, Christopher R. Flowers, Marshall E. Kadin, Ellen T. Chang, Ann Maree Hughes, Stephen Maxted Ansell, Andrew L Feldman, Tracy Lightfoot, Paolo Boffetta, Mads Melbye, Qing Lan, Joshua N. Sampson, Lindsay M. Morton, Yawei Zhang, Dennis D. Weisenburger

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Abstract

Background: Accounting for 10%-15% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas in Western populations, peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) are the most common T-cell lymphoma but little is known about their etiology. Our aim was to identify etiologic risk factors for PTCL overall, and for specific PTCL subtypes, by analyzing data from 15 epidemiologic studies participating in the InterLymph Consortium. Methods: A pooled analysis of individual-level data for 584 histologically confirmed PTCL cases and 15 912 controls from 15 case-control studies conducted in Europe, North America, and Australia was undertaken. Data collected from questionnaires were harmonized to permit evaluation of a broad range of potential risk factors. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression. Results: Risk factors associated with increased overall PTCL risk with a P value less than .05 included: a family history of hematologic malignancies (OR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.30 to 2.84); celiac disease (OR = 17.8, 95% CI = 8.61 to 36.79); eczema (OR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.07 to 1.85); psoriasis (OR = 1.97, 95% CI = 1.17 to 3.32); smoking 40 or more years (OR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.41 to 2.62); and employment as a textile worker (ever) (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.38) and electrical fitter (ever) (OR = 2.89, 95% CI = 1.41 to 5.95). Exposures associated with reduced overall PTCL risk included a personal history of allergies (OR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.54 to 0.87), alcohol consumption (ever) (OR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.49 to 0.82), and having ever lived or worked on a farm (OR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.55% to 0.95%). We also observed the well-established risk elevation for enteropathy-type PTCL among those with celiac disease in our data. Conclusions: Our pooled analyses identified a number of new potential risk factors for PTCL and require further validation in independent series.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)66-75
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute - Monographs
Issue number48
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Medical History Taking
Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Life Style
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Celiac Disease
T-Cell Lymphoma
Textiles
Eczema
Hematologic Neoplasms
North America
Psoriasis
Alcohol Drinking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors for peripheral T-cell lymphomas : The interlymph non-hodgkin lymphoma subtypes project. / Wang, Sophia S.; Flowers, Christopher R.; Kadin, Marshall E.; Chang, Ellen T.; Hughes, Ann Maree; Ansell, Stephen Maxted; Feldman, Andrew L; Lightfoot, Tracy; Boffetta, Paolo; Melbye, Mads; Lan, Qing; Sampson, Joshua N.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Zhang, Yawei; Weisenburger, Dennis D.

In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute - Monographs, No. 48, 2014, p. 66-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Sophia S. ; Flowers, Christopher R. ; Kadin, Marshall E. ; Chang, Ellen T. ; Hughes, Ann Maree ; Ansell, Stephen Maxted ; Feldman, Andrew L ; Lightfoot, Tracy ; Boffetta, Paolo ; Melbye, Mads ; Lan, Qing ; Sampson, Joshua N. ; Morton, Lindsay M. ; Zhang, Yawei ; Weisenburger, Dennis D. / Medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors for peripheral T-cell lymphomas : The interlymph non-hodgkin lymphoma subtypes project. In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute - Monographs. 2014 ; No. 48. pp. 66-75.
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title = "Medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors for peripheral T-cell lymphomas: The interlymph non-hodgkin lymphoma subtypes project",
abstract = "Background: Accounting for 10{\%}-15{\%} of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas in Western populations, peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) are the most common T-cell lymphoma but little is known about their etiology. Our aim was to identify etiologic risk factors for PTCL overall, and for specific PTCL subtypes, by analyzing data from 15 epidemiologic studies participating in the InterLymph Consortium. Methods: A pooled analysis of individual-level data for 584 histologically confirmed PTCL cases and 15 912 controls from 15 case-control studies conducted in Europe, North America, and Australia was undertaken. Data collected from questionnaires were harmonized to permit evaluation of a broad range of potential risk factors. Odds ratios (OR) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression. Results: Risk factors associated with increased overall PTCL risk with a P value less than .05 included: a family history of hematologic malignancies (OR = 1.92, 95{\%} CI = 1.30 to 2.84); celiac disease (OR = 17.8, 95{\%} CI = 8.61 to 36.79); eczema (OR = 1.41, 95{\%} CI = 1.07 to 1.85); psoriasis (OR = 1.97, 95{\%} CI = 1.17 to 3.32); smoking 40 or more years (OR = 1.92, 95{\%} CI = 1.41 to 2.62); and employment as a textile worker (ever) (OR = 1.58, 95{\%} CI = 1.05 to 2.38) and electrical fitter (ever) (OR = 2.89, 95{\%} CI = 1.41 to 5.95). Exposures associated with reduced overall PTCL risk included a personal history of allergies (OR = 0.69, 95{\%} CI = 0.54 to 0.87), alcohol consumption (ever) (OR = 0.64, 95{\%} CI = 0.49 to 0.82), and having ever lived or worked on a farm (OR = 0.72, 95{\%} CI = 0.55{\%} to 0.95{\%}). We also observed the well-established risk elevation for enteropathy-type PTCL among those with celiac disease in our data. Conclusions: Our pooled analyses identified a number of new potential risk factors for PTCL and require further validation in independent series.",
author = "Wang, {Sophia S.} and Flowers, {Christopher R.} and Kadin, {Marshall E.} and Chang, {Ellen T.} and Hughes, {Ann Maree} and Ansell, {Stephen Maxted} and Feldman, {Andrew L} and Tracy Lightfoot and Paolo Boffetta and Mads Melbye and Qing Lan and Sampson, {Joshua N.} and Morton, {Lindsay M.} and Yawei Zhang and Weisenburger, {Dennis D.}",
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T1 - Medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors for peripheral T-cell lymphomas

T2 - The interlymph non-hodgkin lymphoma subtypes project

AU - Wang, Sophia S.

AU - Flowers, Christopher R.

AU - Kadin, Marshall E.

AU - Chang, Ellen T.

AU - Hughes, Ann Maree

AU - Ansell, Stephen Maxted

AU - Feldman, Andrew L

AU - Lightfoot, Tracy

AU - Boffetta, Paolo

AU - Melbye, Mads

AU - Lan, Qing

AU - Sampson, Joshua N.

AU - Morton, Lindsay M.

AU - Zhang, Yawei

AU - Weisenburger, Dennis D.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Background: Accounting for 10%-15% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas in Western populations, peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) are the most common T-cell lymphoma but little is known about their etiology. Our aim was to identify etiologic risk factors for PTCL overall, and for specific PTCL subtypes, by analyzing data from 15 epidemiologic studies participating in the InterLymph Consortium. Methods: A pooled analysis of individual-level data for 584 histologically confirmed PTCL cases and 15 912 controls from 15 case-control studies conducted in Europe, North America, and Australia was undertaken. Data collected from questionnaires were harmonized to permit evaluation of a broad range of potential risk factors. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression. Results: Risk factors associated with increased overall PTCL risk with a P value less than .05 included: a family history of hematologic malignancies (OR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.30 to 2.84); celiac disease (OR = 17.8, 95% CI = 8.61 to 36.79); eczema (OR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.07 to 1.85); psoriasis (OR = 1.97, 95% CI = 1.17 to 3.32); smoking 40 or more years (OR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.41 to 2.62); and employment as a textile worker (ever) (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.38) and electrical fitter (ever) (OR = 2.89, 95% CI = 1.41 to 5.95). Exposures associated with reduced overall PTCL risk included a personal history of allergies (OR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.54 to 0.87), alcohol consumption (ever) (OR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.49 to 0.82), and having ever lived or worked on a farm (OR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.55% to 0.95%). We also observed the well-established risk elevation for enteropathy-type PTCL among those with celiac disease in our data. Conclusions: Our pooled analyses identified a number of new potential risk factors for PTCL and require further validation in independent series.

AB - Background: Accounting for 10%-15% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas in Western populations, peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) are the most common T-cell lymphoma but little is known about their etiology. Our aim was to identify etiologic risk factors for PTCL overall, and for specific PTCL subtypes, by analyzing data from 15 epidemiologic studies participating in the InterLymph Consortium. Methods: A pooled analysis of individual-level data for 584 histologically confirmed PTCL cases and 15 912 controls from 15 case-control studies conducted in Europe, North America, and Australia was undertaken. Data collected from questionnaires were harmonized to permit evaluation of a broad range of potential risk factors. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression. Results: Risk factors associated with increased overall PTCL risk with a P value less than .05 included: a family history of hematologic malignancies (OR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.30 to 2.84); celiac disease (OR = 17.8, 95% CI = 8.61 to 36.79); eczema (OR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.07 to 1.85); psoriasis (OR = 1.97, 95% CI = 1.17 to 3.32); smoking 40 or more years (OR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.41 to 2.62); and employment as a textile worker (ever) (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.38) and electrical fitter (ever) (OR = 2.89, 95% CI = 1.41 to 5.95). Exposures associated with reduced overall PTCL risk included a personal history of allergies (OR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.54 to 0.87), alcohol consumption (ever) (OR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.49 to 0.82), and having ever lived or worked on a farm (OR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.55% to 0.95%). We also observed the well-established risk elevation for enteropathy-type PTCL among those with celiac disease in our data. Conclusions: Our pooled analyses identified a number of new potential risk factors for PTCL and require further validation in independent series.

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