Mechanisms of HIV-associated lymphocyte apoptosis

Andrew David Badley, A. A. Pilon, A. Landay, D. H. Lynch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

223 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with a progressive decrease in CD4 T-cell number and a consequent impairment in host immune defenses. Analysis of T cells from patients infected with HIV, or of T cells infected in vitro with HIV, demonstrates a significant fraction of both infected and uninfected cells dying by apoptosis. The many mechanisms that contribute to HIV-associated lymphocyte apoptosis include chronic immunologic activation; gp120/160 ligation of the CD4 receptor; enhanced production of cytotoxic ligands or viral proteins by monocytes, macrophages, B cells, and CD8 T cells from HIV-infected patients that kill uninfected CD4 T cells; and direct infection of target cells by HIV, resulting in apoptosis. Although HIV infection results in T-cell apoptosis, under some circumstances HIV infection of resting T cells or macrophages does not result in apoptosis; this may be a critical step in the development of viral reservoirs. Recent therapies for HIV effectively reduce lymphoid and peripheral T-cell apoptosis, reduce viral replication, and enhance cellular immune competence; however, they do not alter viral reservoirs. Further understanding the regulation of apoptosis in HIV disease is required to develop novel immune-based therapies aimed at modifying HIV-induced apoptosis to the benefit of patients infected with HIV. (C) 2000 by The American Society of Hematology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2951-2964
Number of pages14
JournalBlood
Volume96
Issue number9
StatePublished - Nov 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Lymphocytes
Viruses
T-cells
HIV
Apoptosis
T-Lymphocytes
Virus Diseases
Macrophages
CD4 Antigens
Viral Proteins
Infection
Mental Competency
Ligation
Monocytes
B-Lymphocytes
Cell Count
Chemical activation
Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Badley, A. D., Pilon, A. A., Landay, A., & Lynch, D. H. (2000). Mechanisms of HIV-associated lymphocyte apoptosis. Blood, 96(9), 2951-2964.

Mechanisms of HIV-associated lymphocyte apoptosis. / Badley, Andrew David; Pilon, A. A.; Landay, A.; Lynch, D. H.

In: Blood, Vol. 96, No. 9, 01.11.2000, p. 2951-2964.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Badley, AD, Pilon, AA, Landay, A & Lynch, DH 2000, 'Mechanisms of HIV-associated lymphocyte apoptosis', Blood, vol. 96, no. 9, pp. 2951-2964.
Badley AD, Pilon AA, Landay A, Lynch DH. Mechanisms of HIV-associated lymphocyte apoptosis. Blood. 2000 Nov 1;96(9):2951-2964.
Badley, Andrew David ; Pilon, A. A. ; Landay, A. ; Lynch, D. H. / Mechanisms of HIV-associated lymphocyte apoptosis. In: Blood. 2000 ; Vol. 96, No. 9. pp. 2951-2964.
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