Mayo registry for telemetry efficacy in arrest (MR TEA) study: An assessment of the effect of admission diagnosis on outcomes from in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest

David Snipelisky, Jordan Ray, Gautam Matcha, Archana Roy, Brooke Clark, Adrian Dumitrascu, Veronica Bosworth, Anastasia Whitman, Patricia Lewis, Tyler Vadeboncoeur, Fred Kusumoto, M. Caroline Burton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Little data exists evaluating how different risk factors influence outcomes following in-hospital arrests. Methods: A retrospective review of patients that suffered a cardiopulmonary arrest between 1 May 2008 and 30 June 2014 was performed. Patients were stratified into subsets based on cardiac versus non-cardiac reasons for admission. Results: 199 patients met inclusion criteria, of which 138 (69.3%) had a non-cardiac reason for admission and 61 (30.7%) a cardiac etiology. No difference in demographics and non-cardiac comorbidities were present. Cardiac-related comorbidities were more prevalent in the cardiac etiology subset. Arrests with a shockable rhythm were more common in the cardiac group (P < 0.0001), yet return of spontaneous circulation from the index event was similar (P = 0.254). More patients in the cardiac group were alive at 24-h post resuscitation (n = 34, 55.7% versus n = 49, 35.5%; P = 0.0085), discharge (n = 21, 34.4% versus n = 19, 13.8%; P = 0.0018), and at last follow-up (n = 13, 21.3% versus n = 14, 10.1%; P = 0.0434). Conclusion: Although patients with cardiac and non-cardiac etiologies for admission have similar rates of return of spontaneous circulation, those with cardiac etiologies are more likely to survive to hospital discharge and outpatient follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-71
Number of pages5
JournalAcute Cardiac Care
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2015

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Telemetry
Heart Arrest
Registries
Comorbidity
Resuscitation
Outpatients
Demography

Keywords

  • Cardiopulmonary arrest
  • outcomes
  • resuscitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Mayo registry for telemetry efficacy in arrest (MR TEA) study : An assessment of the effect of admission diagnosis on outcomes from in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. / Snipelisky, David; Ray, Jordan; Matcha, Gautam; Roy, Archana; Clark, Brooke; Dumitrascu, Adrian; Bosworth, Veronica; Whitman, Anastasia; Lewis, Patricia; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler; Kusumoto, Fred; Burton, M. Caroline.

In: Acute Cardiac Care, Vol. 17, No. 4, 02.10.2015, p. 67-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Snipelisky, D, Ray, J, Matcha, G, Roy, A, Clark, B, Dumitrascu, A, Bosworth, V, Whitman, A, Lewis, P, Vadeboncoeur, T, Kusumoto, F & Burton, MC 2015, 'Mayo registry for telemetry efficacy in arrest (MR TEA) study: An assessment of the effect of admission diagnosis on outcomes from in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest', Acute Cardiac Care, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 67-71. https://doi.org/10.1080/17482941.2016.1203439
Snipelisky, David ; Ray, Jordan ; Matcha, Gautam ; Roy, Archana ; Clark, Brooke ; Dumitrascu, Adrian ; Bosworth, Veronica ; Whitman, Anastasia ; Lewis, Patricia ; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler ; Kusumoto, Fred ; Burton, M. Caroline. / Mayo registry for telemetry efficacy in arrest (MR TEA) study : An assessment of the effect of admission diagnosis on outcomes from in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. In: Acute Cardiac Care. 2015 ; Vol. 17, No. 4. pp. 67-71.
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