Maximal power grasp and three-jaw chuck pinch force as a function of wrist position, age, and glove type

Susan Hallbeck, D. L. McMullin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In many industries, environmental and/or safety considerations require the use of gloves in combination with awkward wrist positions for a diverse workforce. In an effort to quantify the effects of wrist position, glove type, age, gender, and dominant/non-dominant hand on power grasp and three-jaw chuck pinch force magnitudes, a study was performed. Maximal voluntary power grasp and three-jaw chuck pinch force for both the dominant and non-dominant hand were used as the dependent measures of physical capabilities. Six glove types: bare hand, thermal, knit, reinforced knit, a layered combination of thermal and knit, and a layered combination of thermal and reinforced knit were used as one of the independent variables. For each glove condition, one of five wrist positions was employed: 65° extensions, neutral, 45° flexion. Male and female subjects were selected from three age categories (20-25, 40-45, and 60-65). Five subjects within each age-gender category were tested giving a total of 30 subjects. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) for the dependent variable power grasp demonstrated that gender, glove type, hand, and wrist position had a significant impact on the magnitude of force exerted. The ANOVA on the dependent variable three-jaw pinch showed that gender, hand and wrist position were significant, as found for grasp; however, glove type was not significant for pinch. The Pearson product-moment correlation between grasp and three-jaw chuck pinch was calculated overall and calculated by significant effects. While the correlations were statistically significant, the level of correlation was not acceptable. A linear regression was performed to predict peak three-jaw chuck pinch from maximal power grasp force. As found with the correlations, a statistically significant regression was performed with a resultant unacceptable R2 value.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-206
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Industrial Ergonomics
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Chucks
Hand Strength
Jaw
Wrist
Hand
gender
Analysis of variance (ANOVA)
analysis of variance
Hot Temperature
regression
Analysis of Variance
Linear regression
industry
Linear Models
Industry
Safety
Values

Keywords

  • age
  • gender
  • gloves
  • hand
  • Maximal power grip
  • pinch force
  • wrist position

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Maximal power grasp and three-jaw chuck pinch force as a function of wrist position, age, and glove type. / Hallbeck, Susan; McMullin, D. L.

In: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, Vol. 11, No. 3, 1993, p. 195-206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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