Matrix biomechanics and dynamics in pulmonary fibrosis

Andrew J. Haak, Qi Tan, Daniel J Tschumperlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The composition and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix are dramatically altered during the development and progression of pulmonary fibrosis. Recent evidence indicates that these changes in matrix composition and mechanics are not only end-results of fibrotic remodeling, but active participants in driving disease progression. These insights have stimulated interest in identifying the components and physical aspects of the matrix that contribute to cell activation and disease initiation and progression. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the biomechanics and dynamics of the ECM in mouse models and human IPF, and discusses how matrix mechanical and compositional changes might be non-invasively assessed, therapeutically targeted, and biologically restored to resolve fibrosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalMatrix Biology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2017

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Pulmonary Fibrosis
Biomechanical Phenomena
Disease Progression
Mechanics
Extracellular Matrix
Fibrosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Matrix biomechanics and dynamics in pulmonary fibrosis. / Haak, Andrew J.; Tan, Qi; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.

In: Matrix Biology, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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