Mandibular Tori Limiting Treatment of Carcinoma of the Upper Aerodigestive Tract

Christopher M. Low, Daniel L. Price, Jan Kasperbauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Mandibular tori are a rare cause of difficult direct visualization of the upper aerodigestive tract. In the setting of aerodigestive tract pathology necessitating direct visualization, removal of mandibular tori may be required to facilitate treatment. Methods: In the first case, large bilateral symmetric mandibular tori were removed to facilitate access to the anterior commissure and removal of a T1 glottic squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In the second case, large bilateral mandibular tori were removed to access a markedly exophytic SCC in the right vallecula. Subsequently, the tumor was removed with robotic assistance with excellent exposure. Results: Both patients were free of recurrence at last follow-up. Conclusion: Mandibular tori are an uncommon cause of difficult direct laryngoscopy. In situations that require direct visualization of the anterior commissure or base of tongue for diagnosis and management of lesions, surgical removal of the tori may be required as in the cases presented here.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Medicine Insights: Case Reports
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019

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Tongue
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Carcinoma
Laryngoscopy
Robotics
Pathology
Recurrence
Therapeutics
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • difficult visualization
  • direct laryngoscopy
  • glottic carcinoma
  • mandibular tori
  • oropharyngeal carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Mandibular Tori Limiting Treatment of Carcinoma of the Upper Aerodigestive Tract. / Low, Christopher M.; Price, Daniel L.; Kasperbauer, Jan.

In: Clinical Medicine Insights: Case Reports, Vol. 12, 01.07.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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