Mandibular Defect Reconstitution: A Contaminated Caprine Model of Bone Regeneration

Jan Kasperbauer, Nicole Henry Creppel, Claudia Gutierrez, Heidi D. Lehrke, Christoph Prummer, Michael J. Yaszemski, DJ Schembri Wismayer, Jeffrey R. Janus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Mandibular reconstitution with bioabsorbable scaffolds seems feasible with the application of 3-dimensional printing combined with bioactive proteins. As yet, previous studies have been limited in number of animals and have avoided a contaminated defect. We present a caprine model of mandibular defect bone regeneration with a 3-dimensionally printed bioabsorbable scaffold contaminated with oral secretions and explore the impact of bone morphogenic protein in mandibular bone reconstitution. Methods: A 3-cm, contaminated mandibular defect was generated in 18 goats and stabilized with 2 mandibular reconstruction plates. An uncoated scaffold was placed in 6 goats, and in the final 6 goats, the scaffold was coated with bone morphogenic protein-2. In 6 goats, the defect was left empty. After 12 weeks, the operative site, scaffold, and adjacent mandible were plasticized, sectioned, and evaluated histologically to assess for bone regeneration. Results: The specimens revealed only focal (average of 5.8% of the scaffold pores) and early bone formation in the scaffold-only group. In the scaffold + bone morphogenic protein-2 group, there was more (average of 51.4% of the pores) bone formation. In the periosteum-only group, the ratio of the bone thickness of the defect to that of the normal bone ranged from 0.16 to 0.78. No major infections occurred. Conclusions: This caprine model serves as an excellent method to assess reconstructive options for contaminated mandibular deficits. Bone regeneration was documented in a 3-cm contaminated caprine mandibular defect reconstructed with a 3-dimensionally printed synthetic scaffold with or without the addition of bone morphogenic protein-2. Bone morphogenic protein-2 significantly augments bone generation in the synthetic scaffold. Residual mandibular periosteum generated bone. Future studies will focus on optimizing vascularization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oral Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Mandibular Defect Reconstitution: A Contaminated Caprine Model of Bone Regeneration'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this