Management of hot flashes in breast-cancer survivors

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hot flashes can be a major problem for patients with a history of breast cancer. Although oestrogen can alleviate hot flashes to a large extent in most patients, there has been debate about the safety of oestrogen use in survivors of breast cancer. The decrease in hot flashes achieved with progestational agents is similar to that seen with oestrogen therapy but, again, there is some debate about the safety of progestational agents in patients with a history of breast cancer. Several alternative substances have therefore been investigated. These include a belladonna alkaloid preparation, clonidine, soy phyto-oestrogens, vitamin E, gabapentin, and several of the newer antidepressants, with venlafaxine being the best studied to date. Several studies in progress may provide better non-hormonal means of treating hot flashes in the future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-204
Number of pages6
JournalLancet Oncology
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hot Flashes
Survivors
Breast Neoplasms
Estrogens
Progestins
Belladonna Alkaloids
Safety
Phytoestrogens
Clonidine
Vitamin E
Antidepressive Agents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Management of hot flashes in breast-cancer survivors. / Loprinzi, Charles Lawrence; Barton, Debra L.; Rhodes, Deborah.

In: Lancet Oncology, Vol. 2, No. 4, 01.04.2001, p. 199-204.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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