Malignant chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells elaborate soluble factors that down-regulate T cell and NK function

J. D. Burton, C. H. Weitz, Neil Elliot Kay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine if the frequently observed T cell and natural killer dysfunction in B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia might be related to the presence of large numbers of malignant B cells, we studied the effects of secretory or shed products of CLL B cells on normal (control) T cell and NK function. The cell-free supernatants from CLL B cells cultured from 24 to 48 hr inhibited a variety of T cell functions including: PHA-induced proliferation, PHA-stimulated entry of T cells into the cell cycle, and PHA-induced production of interleukin-2. In addition, B-CLL supernatants diminished control NK activity. Purified control B cells and other malignant cell lines produced little or no inhibitory activity toward these T cell or NK functions. The sera from these same B-CLL patients diminished PHA-induced interleukin-2 production by control T cells. Initial molecular characterization of the inhibitory factor(s) revealed it to be of low molecular weight (< 5000 daltons) with loss of functional activity after treatment with neuraminidase. This suggested that this substance might be either a ganglioside or glycoprotein whose inhibitory activity depends on the presence of a sialic acid moiety. If CLL B cell are capable of secreting or shedding immunosuppressive factor(s), then alteration of this property may result in a more normal immune system for these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-67
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Hematology
Volume30
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

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B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
B-Lymphocytes
Down-Regulation
T-Lymphocytes
Interleukin-2
Natural Killer T-Cells
Gangliosides
Neuraminidase
N-Acetylneuraminic Acid
Immunosuppressive Agents
Immune System
Glycoproteins
Cell Cycle
Molecular Weight
Cell Line
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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Malignant chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells elaborate soluble factors that down-regulate T cell and NK function. / Burton, J. D.; Weitz, C. H.; Kay, Neil Elliot.

In: American Journal of Hematology, Vol. 30, No. 2, 1989, p. 61-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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