Making the Case to Study the Volume-Outcome Relationship in Hematologic Cancers

Ronald S. Go, Wayne A. Bottner, Morie Gertz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The positive relationship between the volume of health services (hospital and physician) and health-related outcomes is established in the complex surgical treatment of cancers and certain nononcologic medical conditions. However, this topic has not been systematically explored in the medical management of cancers. We summarize the limited current state of knowledge about the volume-outcome relationship in the management of hematologic cancers and provide reasons why further research on this subject is necessary. We highlight the relatively low annual volume of hematologic cancers in the United States, the increasing complexity of making a diagnosis due to constant change in classification and prognostication, the rapid availability of novel agents with unique mechanisms of action and toxicities, and the proliferation of treatment guidelines distinct to each disease subtype. We also discuss the potential implications pertaining to medical practice and trainee education, including effects on quality of care, access and referral patterns, and subspecialty training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1106
Pages (from-to)1393-1399
Number of pages7
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume90
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

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Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Neoplasms
Quality of Health Care
Health Services
Referral and Consultation
Guidelines
Physicians
Education
Health
Therapeutics
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Making the Case to Study the Volume-Outcome Relationship in Hematologic Cancers. / Go, Ronald S.; Bottner, Wayne A.; Gertz, Morie.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 90, No. 10, 1106, 01.10.2015, p. 1393-1399.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Go, Ronald S. ; Bottner, Wayne A. ; Gertz, Morie. / Making the Case to Study the Volume-Outcome Relationship in Hematologic Cancers. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2015 ; Vol. 90, No. 10. pp. 1393-1399.
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