Magnetic resonance elastography assesment of focused ultrasound surgery in cancer models - A pilot study

Svetlana V. Primak, Kevin J. Glaser, Jinping Lai, Phillip J. Rossman, Yuan Le, Carol A. Reynolds, Lewis R. Roberts, Joel P. Felmlee, Richard L. Ehman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

MRI guided focused ultrasound (FUS) has been shown to create thermal lesions where tissue stiffness changes significantly. To assess the correlation between tissue stiffness change and tissue ablation, a pilot animal based study was conducted to treat LNCaP tumors in vivo and Hep3B tumors immediately post mortem. MR elastography was used to analyze tissue stiffness before and after ablation. Treated tissue was excised immediately after each experiment and processed by routine histological analysis. Four prostate cancer tumors and four liver cancer tumors showed, on average, a threefold increase in stiffness due to FUS thermal treatment. Histology showed complete (100%) coagulation necrosis in these cases. These data suggest that MRE may be an effective means to assess tissue ablation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of 2006 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE2006 - Bioengineering Division
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
ISBN (Print)0791837904, 9780791837900
StatePublished - 2006
Event2006 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE2006 - Chicago, IL, United States
Duration: Nov 5 2006Nov 10 2006

Publication series

NameAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED
ISSN (Print)1071-6947

Other

Other2006 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE2006
CountryUnited States
CityChicago, IL
Period11/5/0611/10/06

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Magnetic resonance elastography assesment of focused ultrasound surgery in cancer models - A pilot study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this