Macroscopic and microscopic studies of electrical properties of very thin silicon dioxide subject to electrical stress

E. S. Daniel, J. T. Jones, O. J. Marsh, T. C. McGill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The electrical characteristics of various size tunnel switch diode devices, composed of Al/SiO2/n-Si/p + -Si layers, which operate with a range of parameters (such as current densities in excess of 104 A/cm2) that stress the oxide layer far beyond the levels used in typical thin oxide metal-oxide semiconductor research have been examined. It is found that the first time a large current and electric field are applied to the device, a "forming" process enhances transport through the oxide in the vicinity of the edges of the gate electrode, but the oxide still retains its integrity as a tunnel barrier. The device operation is relatively stable to stresses of greater than 107 C/cm2 areally averaged, time-integrated charge injection. Duplication and characterization of these modified oxide tunneling properties was attempted using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to stress and probe the oxide. Electrical stressing with the STM tip creates regions of reduced conductivity, possibly resulting from trapped charge in the oxide. Lateral variations in the conductivity of the unstressed oxide over regions roughly 20-50 nm across were also found.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1089-1096
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Vacuum Science and Technology B: Microelectronics and Nanometer Structures
Volume15
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Electric properties
electrical properties
Silica
silicon dioxide
Oxides
oxides
Scanning tunneling microscopy
tunnels
scanning tunneling microscopy
Tunnels
conductivity
Charge injection
metal oxide semiconductors
integrity
Diodes
Current density
switches
diodes
Switches
Electric fields

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)
  • Surfaces and Interfaces

Cite this

Macroscopic and microscopic studies of electrical properties of very thin silicon dioxide subject to electrical stress. / Daniel, E. S.; Jones, J. T.; Marsh, O. J.; McGill, T. C.

In: Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology B: Microelectronics and Nanometer Structures, Vol. 15, No. 4, 07.1997, p. 1089-1096.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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