Lymphomatoid granulomatosis

Evidence of immunophenotypic diversity and relationship to Epstein-Barr virus infection

J. L. Myers, P. J. Kurtin, A. L A Katzenstein, H. D. Tazelaar, T. V. Colby, J. G. Strickler, R. V. Lloyd, P. G. Isaacson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

132 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We studied open-lung biopsies from 17 patients with pulmonary lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LYG) using paraffin-section immunostains and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) RNA in situ hybridization to assess the phenotype of these unique tumors and to clarify the role of EBV infection. Histologically, all cases demonstrated the characteristic mixed mononuclear cell infiltrate of lymphomatoid granulomatosis with variable numbers of cytologically atypical large lymphoid cells in a background of small lymphocytes. Paraffin-section immunostains in all cases showed a predominance of T lymphocytes. A minor population of CD20-positive large B lymphocytes was identified in 11 cases; immunoglobulin light-chain restriction was demonstrated in four of these and immunoglobulin gene rearrangements in another case. Nuclear labelling fur EBV RNA was detected in 10 of these 11 cases and was confined to the population of large B lymphocytes. Staining for CD20 was absent in the remaining six cases, as was nuclear labeling for EBV RNA. However, the large atypical lymphoid cells stained for T-cell-lineage-specific antibodies in three of these cases. We conclude that some cases of lymphomatoid granulomatosis are B-cell lymphoma associated with EBV infection, whereas others are of T-cell origin and are probably unrelated to EBV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1300-1312
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgical Pathology
Volume19
Issue number11
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections
Human Herpesvirus 4
Lymphocytes
RNA
T-Lymphocytes
Paraffin
B-Lymphocytes
Immunoglobulin Light Chains
Lung
Immunoglobulin Genes
Gene Rearrangement
B-Cell Lymphoma
Cell Lineage
Population
In Situ Hybridization
Staining and Labeling
Phenotype
Biopsy
Antibodies

Keywords

  • Angioimmunoproliferative lesion
  • Epstein-Barr virus
  • Lymphomatoid granulomatosis
  • Malignant lymphoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Myers, J. L., Kurtin, P. J., Katzenstein, A. L. A., Tazelaar, H. D., Colby, T. V., Strickler, J. G., ... Isaacson, P. G. (1995). Lymphomatoid granulomatosis: Evidence of immunophenotypic diversity and relationship to Epstein-Barr virus infection. American Journal of Surgical Pathology, 19(11), 1300-1312.

Lymphomatoid granulomatosis : Evidence of immunophenotypic diversity and relationship to Epstein-Barr virus infection. / Myers, J. L.; Kurtin, P. J.; Katzenstein, A. L A; Tazelaar, H. D.; Colby, T. V.; Strickler, J. G.; Lloyd, R. V.; Isaacson, P. G.

In: American Journal of Surgical Pathology, Vol. 19, No. 11, 1995, p. 1300-1312.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Myers, JL, Kurtin, PJ, Katzenstein, ALA, Tazelaar, HD, Colby, TV, Strickler, JG, Lloyd, RV & Isaacson, PG 1995, 'Lymphomatoid granulomatosis: Evidence of immunophenotypic diversity and relationship to Epstein-Barr virus infection', American Journal of Surgical Pathology, vol. 19, no. 11, pp. 1300-1312.
Myers JL, Kurtin PJ, Katzenstein ALA, Tazelaar HD, Colby TV, Strickler JG et al. Lymphomatoid granulomatosis: Evidence of immunophenotypic diversity and relationship to Epstein-Barr virus infection. American Journal of Surgical Pathology. 1995;19(11):1300-1312.
Myers, J. L. ; Kurtin, P. J. ; Katzenstein, A. L A ; Tazelaar, H. D. ; Colby, T. V. ; Strickler, J. G. ; Lloyd, R. V. ; Isaacson, P. G. / Lymphomatoid granulomatosis : Evidence of immunophenotypic diversity and relationship to Epstein-Barr virus infection. In: American Journal of Surgical Pathology. 1995 ; Vol. 19, No. 11. pp. 1300-1312.
@article{57ae5ea861224434b6a69e55103d5c88,
title = "Lymphomatoid granulomatosis: Evidence of immunophenotypic diversity and relationship to Epstein-Barr virus infection",
abstract = "We studied open-lung biopsies from 17 patients with pulmonary lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LYG) using paraffin-section immunostains and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) RNA in situ hybridization to assess the phenotype of these unique tumors and to clarify the role of EBV infection. Histologically, all cases demonstrated the characteristic mixed mononuclear cell infiltrate of lymphomatoid granulomatosis with variable numbers of cytologically atypical large lymphoid cells in a background of small lymphocytes. Paraffin-section immunostains in all cases showed a predominance of T lymphocytes. A minor population of CD20-positive large B lymphocytes was identified in 11 cases; immunoglobulin light-chain restriction was demonstrated in four of these and immunoglobulin gene rearrangements in another case. Nuclear labelling fur EBV RNA was detected in 10 of these 11 cases and was confined to the population of large B lymphocytes. Staining for CD20 was absent in the remaining six cases, as was nuclear labeling for EBV RNA. However, the large atypical lymphoid cells stained for T-cell-lineage-specific antibodies in three of these cases. We conclude that some cases of lymphomatoid granulomatosis are B-cell lymphoma associated with EBV infection, whereas others are of T-cell origin and are probably unrelated to EBV infection.",
keywords = "Angioimmunoproliferative lesion, Epstein-Barr virus, Lymphomatoid granulomatosis, Malignant lymphoma",
author = "Myers, {J. L.} and Kurtin, {P. J.} and Katzenstein, {A. L A} and Tazelaar, {H. D.} and Colby, {T. V.} and Strickler, {J. G.} and Lloyd, {R. V.} and Isaacson, {P. G.}",
year = "1995",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "1300--1312",
journal = "American Journal of Surgical Pathology",
issn = "0147-5185",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lymphomatoid granulomatosis

T2 - Evidence of immunophenotypic diversity and relationship to Epstein-Barr virus infection

AU - Myers, J. L.

AU - Kurtin, P. J.

AU - Katzenstein, A. L A

AU - Tazelaar, H. D.

AU - Colby, T. V.

AU - Strickler, J. G.

AU - Lloyd, R. V.

AU - Isaacson, P. G.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - We studied open-lung biopsies from 17 patients with pulmonary lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LYG) using paraffin-section immunostains and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) RNA in situ hybridization to assess the phenotype of these unique tumors and to clarify the role of EBV infection. Histologically, all cases demonstrated the characteristic mixed mononuclear cell infiltrate of lymphomatoid granulomatosis with variable numbers of cytologically atypical large lymphoid cells in a background of small lymphocytes. Paraffin-section immunostains in all cases showed a predominance of T lymphocytes. A minor population of CD20-positive large B lymphocytes was identified in 11 cases; immunoglobulin light-chain restriction was demonstrated in four of these and immunoglobulin gene rearrangements in another case. Nuclear labelling fur EBV RNA was detected in 10 of these 11 cases and was confined to the population of large B lymphocytes. Staining for CD20 was absent in the remaining six cases, as was nuclear labeling for EBV RNA. However, the large atypical lymphoid cells stained for T-cell-lineage-specific antibodies in three of these cases. We conclude that some cases of lymphomatoid granulomatosis are B-cell lymphoma associated with EBV infection, whereas others are of T-cell origin and are probably unrelated to EBV infection.

AB - We studied open-lung biopsies from 17 patients with pulmonary lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LYG) using paraffin-section immunostains and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) RNA in situ hybridization to assess the phenotype of these unique tumors and to clarify the role of EBV infection. Histologically, all cases demonstrated the characteristic mixed mononuclear cell infiltrate of lymphomatoid granulomatosis with variable numbers of cytologically atypical large lymphoid cells in a background of small lymphocytes. Paraffin-section immunostains in all cases showed a predominance of T lymphocytes. A minor population of CD20-positive large B lymphocytes was identified in 11 cases; immunoglobulin light-chain restriction was demonstrated in four of these and immunoglobulin gene rearrangements in another case. Nuclear labelling fur EBV RNA was detected in 10 of these 11 cases and was confined to the population of large B lymphocytes. Staining for CD20 was absent in the remaining six cases, as was nuclear labeling for EBV RNA. However, the large atypical lymphoid cells stained for T-cell-lineage-specific antibodies in three of these cases. We conclude that some cases of lymphomatoid granulomatosis are B-cell lymphoma associated with EBV infection, whereas others are of T-cell origin and are probably unrelated to EBV infection.

KW - Angioimmunoproliferative lesion

KW - Epstein-Barr virus

KW - Lymphomatoid granulomatosis

KW - Malignant lymphoma

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028823910&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028823910&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 1300

EP - 1312

JO - American Journal of Surgical Pathology

JF - American Journal of Surgical Pathology

SN - 0147-5185

IS - 11

ER -