Lymphomas in patients with connective tissue disease: Comparison of p53 protein expression and latent EBV infection in patients immunosuppressed and not immunosuppressed with methotrexate

David M. Menke, Henrik Griesser, Kevin G. Moder, Ayalew Tefferi, Harvinder S. Luthra, Marc D. Cohen, Gerardo Colon-Otero, Ricardo V. Lloyd

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35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cell cycle dysregulation as measured by p53 protein expression and latent Epstein-Barr (EBV) infection are important in the pathogenesis of lymphoma, particularly in immunosuppressed patients. Although latent EBV commonly is detected in lymphomas arising in patients with connective tissue disease who are immunosuppressed with methotrexate, p53 protein expression has not been reported. We compared the immunohistologic expression of p53 protein and the incidence of latent EBV infection in lymphomas arising in patients with connective tissue disease treated and not treated with methotrexate. Increased p53 staining was detected in 10 of 11 lymphomas arising in patients after methotrexate therapy vs 5 of 11 in patients not treated with methotrexate. Latent EBV was detected in 7 of 13 lymphomas arising in patients after methotrexate therapy vs 2 of 11 in patients not treated with methotrexate. Concordant p53 expression and latent EBV were detected in 5 of 7 lymphomas arising after treatment with methotrexate, including 1 that regressed after methotrexate therapy was withdrawn. These findings suggest that cell cycle dysregulation and EBV-related transformation are important in the pathogenesis of lymphomas arising in patients with connective tissue disease who are immunosuppressed with methotrexate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)212-218
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of clinical pathology
Volume113
Issue number2
StatePublished - May 1 2000

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Keywords

  • Connective tissue disease
  • Immunosuppression
  • Latent Epstein-Barr virus
  • Lymphoma
  • p53 protein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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