Lymphoma

Jennifer Herrick, Ahmet Dogan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction The cornerstone of the diagnosis of lymphoma is the architectural pattern and cytology of the lesion in the affected tissue and this is supplemented by immunophenotypic, molecular and cytogenetic characteristics. These features together define our modern classification scheme of lymphoma. These same investigations are utilized in the assessment of bone marrow involvement by lymphoma, but with some variations and limitations. The role of bone marrow examination varies according to the subtype of lymphoma. This chapter will provide the general principles and practical guidelines of the most useful diagnostic techniques for the detection of bone marrow involvement by malignant lymphomas. It will detail the typical features and roles of morphology, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometric immunophenotyping, cytogenetic and molecular testing in different types of lymphoma. The existence of significant variations from the classical description will be identified by “caveats.” Disease monitoring and pre-transplant assessment will be discussed where applicable. Acronyms used for the various entities are listed in Table 11.1. General principles of bone marrow evaluation in lymphoma Bone marrow examination is routinely performed for lymphoma staging. A bone marrow may also be performed as an ad hoc diagnostic procedure in patients suspected of having a neoplasm lymphoma but who are not deemed suitable for a surgical biopsy of the implicated tissue lesion (e.g. thrombocytopenia, anticoagulation, unsuitable for general anesthesia). In many specimens malignancy (hematopoietic or non-hematopoietic) and cell lineage can be established. However, accurate sub-typing may require correlation with a tissue biopsy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDiagnostic Techniques in Hematological Malignancies
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages206-243
Number of pages38
ISBN (Print)9780511760273, 9780521111218
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Lymphoma
Bone Marrow
Bone Marrow Examination
Cytogenetics
Biopsy
Immunophenotyping
Cell Lineage
Hematologic Neoplasms
Thrombocytopenia
General Anesthesia
Cell Biology
Immunohistochemistry
Guidelines
Transplants
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Herrick, J., & Dogan, A. (2010). Lymphoma. In Diagnostic Techniques in Hematological Malignancies (pp. 206-243). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511760273.012

Lymphoma. / Herrick, Jennifer; Dogan, Ahmet.

Diagnostic Techniques in Hematological Malignancies. Cambridge University Press, 2010. p. 206-243.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Herrick, J & Dogan, A 2010, Lymphoma. in Diagnostic Techniques in Hematological Malignancies. Cambridge University Press, pp. 206-243. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511760273.012
Herrick J, Dogan A. Lymphoma. In Diagnostic Techniques in Hematological Malignancies. Cambridge University Press. 2010. p. 206-243 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511760273.012
Herrick, Jennifer ; Dogan, Ahmet. / Lymphoma. Diagnostic Techniques in Hematological Malignancies. Cambridge University Press, 2010. pp. 206-243
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