Lyme disease: Resolution of a serous retinal detachment and chorioretinal folds after antibiotic therapy

Hans S. Grinager, David A. Krason, Timothy Olsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Ocular manifestations of Lyme disease are uncommon. There has not been a documented case of serous retinal detachment and chorioretinal folds because of Lyme disease that have resolved after only antibiotic treatment. Methods (Case Report): A 69-year-old white man with a history of recent tick bites presented with a gradual decrease in visual acuity in the left eye. Initial visual acuity was 3/200 in the left eye. Examination revealed an inferior, serous, macula-off retinal detachment. Chorioretinal folds were also noted. Lyme screening antibody test (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) was positive and a confirmatory Western blot was immunoglobulin M negative and immunoglobulin G positive. Results: Oral amoxicillin (500 mg 3 times daily for 2 weeks) was given followed by intravenous ceftriaxone (2 g daily for 4 weeks). After two weeks of ceftriaxone, fundus examination and ultrasonography showed complete reattachment of the macula and periphery, and only mild residual chorioretinal folds remained on fluorescein angiogram. Conclusion: We suggest that Borrelia burgdorferi infection led to choroidal inflammation with secondary chorioretinal folds and a serous retinal detachment, which resolved with antibiotic therapy alone. This supports the suspicion of an intraocular infection, perhaps involving the choroid, as opposed to a secondary autoimmune reaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)232-234
Number of pages3
JournalRetinal Cases and Brief Reports
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lyme Disease
Retinal Detachment
Ceftriaxone
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Visual Acuity
Eye Manifestations
Borrelia Infections
Tick Bites
Borrelia burgdorferi
Choroid
Amoxicillin
Fluorescein
Immunoglobulin M
Ultrasonography
Angiography
Therapeutics
Immunoglobulin G
Western Blotting
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Inflammation

Keywords

  • Borrelia burgdorferi
  • Chorioretinal folds
  • Lyme disease
  • Serous retinal detachment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Lyme disease : Resolution of a serous retinal detachment and chorioretinal folds after antibiotic therapy. / Grinager, Hans S.; Krason, David A.; Olsen, Timothy.

In: Retinal Cases and Brief Reports, Vol. 6, No. 3, 01.06.2012, p. 232-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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