Lumbar peritoneal shunting with video-laparoscopic assistance: A useful technique for the management of refractory postoperative lumbar CSF leaks

H. Gordon Deen, Paul D. Pettit, Bernd U. Sevin, Robert E. Wharen, Ronald Reimer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Cerebrospinal fistulas and pseudomeningoceles can occur after lumbar spinal surgery, and are sometimes refractory to direct repair, external drainage, and blood patches. The authors report a technique for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion from the lumbar spine to the peritoneum to assist with the management of these difficult situations. Methods: Using video-laparoscopic assistance, two shunts are placed from the lumbar region into the peritoneal cavity: first, a lumbar subarachnoid space to peritoneum shunt; and second, a meningocele cavity to peritoneum shunt. Patients are ambulated immediately after the procedure. External drains are not used. Results: Four patients with refractory CSF leaks were successfully managed with this technique. Complications associated with prolonged bedrest and external drains were avoided. Ancillary procedures were minimized, and hospital stay was shortened. Laparoscopic assistance offered verification of accurate placement of the peritoneal catheter and shortened operative times. Conclusions: Dual lumbar peritoneal shunts (intrathecal-peritoneal and meningocele cavity-peritoneal), placed with laparoscopic assistance, proved effective in the management of four patients with postoperative lumbar CSF leaks, who had failed to respond to conventional treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)472-476
Number of pages5
JournalSurgical Neurology
Volume59
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2003

Keywords

  • CSF leak
  • Laparoscopic surgery
  • Lumbar peritoneal shunt

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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