Low levels of vitamin D and worsening of knee osteoarthritis: Results of two longitudinal studies

David T. Felson, Jingbo Niu, Margaret Clancy, Piran Aliabadi, Burton Sack, Ali Guermazi, David J. Hunter, Shreyasee Amin, Gail Rogers, Sarah L. Booth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

125 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To confirm reports that 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with an increased risk of joint space narrowing or cartilage loss in osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. We measured 25(OH)D levels in subjects from 2 longitudinal cohort studies, the Framingham Osteoarthritis Study and the Boston Osteoarthritis of the Knee Study (BOKS). In the first, weight-bearing anteroposterior (AP) and lateral knee radiographs were obtained on subjects in 1993-1994 and again in 2002-2005 (mean interval 9 years); blood was drawn for measurement of vitamin D status in 1996-2000. In the second, subjects with symptomatic knee OA participating in a natural history study had fluoroscopically positioned semiflexed posteroanterior (PA) and lateral radiography of both knees and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the more symptomatic knee performed at baseline and at 15 and 30 months. Blood was drawn at all visits, and the baseline specimen was used when available. In both studies, we defined radiographic worsening based on joint space loss in the tibiofemoral joint on either AP/PA or lateral weight-bearing views, using a semiquantitative scale (worsening defined as increase by ≥1 on a 0-3 scale). In the BOKS, we evaluated cartilage loss semiquantitatively, using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score. In both studies, 25(OH)D levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Analyses focused on whether vitamin D levels, defined in tertiles or as deficient (25[OH]D <20 ng/ml) versus nondeficient, predicted worsening of OA. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, body mass index, sex, and baseline OA level was used. Results. The 715 subjects in the Framingham Study had a mean 25(OH)D level of 20 ng/ml at baseline, and 20.3% of the knees showed worsening, during the course of the study, with most knees having had no evidence of OA at baseline. The 277 subjects with OA in the BOKS had a mean 25(OH)D level of 20 ng/ml at baseline with 23.6% of knees showing radiographic worsening. We found no association of baseline 25(OH)D levels with radiographic worsening in either cohort, and confidence limits in the analyses of vitamin D deficiency were narrow, suggesting that results were not based on insufficient power. In fact, the risk of worsening was slightly, but not significantly, lower in persons with low levels of vitamin D than in persons with higher levels. In the BOKS, vitamin D levels were unrelated to cartilage loss seen on MRI. Conclusion. The findings indicate that vitamin D status is unrelated to the risk of joint space or cartilage loss in knee OA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-136
Number of pages8
JournalArthritis and Rheumatism
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007

Fingerprint

Knee Osteoarthritis
Vitamin D
Osteoarthritis
Longitudinal Studies
Knee
Cartilage
Joints
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Weight-Bearing
Vitamin D Deficiency
Natural History
Radiography
Radioimmunoassay
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Felson, D. T., Niu, J., Clancy, M., Aliabadi, P., Sack, B., Guermazi, A., ... Booth, S. L. (2007). Low levels of vitamin D and worsening of knee osteoarthritis: Results of two longitudinal studies. Arthritis and Rheumatism, 56(1), 129-136. https://doi.org/10.1002/art.22292

Low levels of vitamin D and worsening of knee osteoarthritis : Results of two longitudinal studies. / Felson, David T.; Niu, Jingbo; Clancy, Margaret; Aliabadi, Piran; Sack, Burton; Guermazi, Ali; Hunter, David J.; Amin, Shreyasee; Rogers, Gail; Booth, Sarah L.

In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 56, No. 1, 01.2007, p. 129-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Felson, DT, Niu, J, Clancy, M, Aliabadi, P, Sack, B, Guermazi, A, Hunter, DJ, Amin, S, Rogers, G & Booth, SL 2007, 'Low levels of vitamin D and worsening of knee osteoarthritis: Results of two longitudinal studies', Arthritis and Rheumatism, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 129-136. https://doi.org/10.1002/art.22292
Felson, David T. ; Niu, Jingbo ; Clancy, Margaret ; Aliabadi, Piran ; Sack, Burton ; Guermazi, Ali ; Hunter, David J. ; Amin, Shreyasee ; Rogers, Gail ; Booth, Sarah L. / Low levels of vitamin D and worsening of knee osteoarthritis : Results of two longitudinal studies. In: Arthritis and Rheumatism. 2007 ; Vol. 56, No. 1. pp. 129-136.
@article{cb26cf114d3b4b3e8ad3979e7c4e958a,
title = "Low levels of vitamin D and worsening of knee osteoarthritis: Results of two longitudinal studies",
abstract = "Objective. To confirm reports that 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with an increased risk of joint space narrowing or cartilage loss in osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. We measured 25(OH)D levels in subjects from 2 longitudinal cohort studies, the Framingham Osteoarthritis Study and the Boston Osteoarthritis of the Knee Study (BOKS). In the first, weight-bearing anteroposterior (AP) and lateral knee radiographs were obtained on subjects in 1993-1994 and again in 2002-2005 (mean interval 9 years); blood was drawn for measurement of vitamin D status in 1996-2000. In the second, subjects with symptomatic knee OA participating in a natural history study had fluoroscopically positioned semiflexed posteroanterior (PA) and lateral radiography of both knees and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the more symptomatic knee performed at baseline and at 15 and 30 months. Blood was drawn at all visits, and the baseline specimen was used when available. In both studies, we defined radiographic worsening based on joint space loss in the tibiofemoral joint on either AP/PA or lateral weight-bearing views, using a semiquantitative scale (worsening defined as increase by ≥1 on a 0-3 scale). In the BOKS, we evaluated cartilage loss semiquantitatively, using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score. In both studies, 25(OH)D levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Analyses focused on whether vitamin D levels, defined in tertiles or as deficient (25[OH]D <20 ng/ml) versus nondeficient, predicted worsening of OA. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, body mass index, sex, and baseline OA level was used. Results. The 715 subjects in the Framingham Study had a mean 25(OH)D level of 20 ng/ml at baseline, and 20.3{\%} of the knees showed worsening, during the course of the study, with most knees having had no evidence of OA at baseline. The 277 subjects with OA in the BOKS had a mean 25(OH)D level of 20 ng/ml at baseline with 23.6{\%} of knees showing radiographic worsening. We found no association of baseline 25(OH)D levels with radiographic worsening in either cohort, and confidence limits in the analyses of vitamin D deficiency were narrow, suggesting that results were not based on insufficient power. In fact, the risk of worsening was slightly, but not significantly, lower in persons with low levels of vitamin D than in persons with higher levels. In the BOKS, vitamin D levels were unrelated to cartilage loss seen on MRI. Conclusion. The findings indicate that vitamin D status is unrelated to the risk of joint space or cartilage loss in knee OA.",
author = "Felson, {David T.} and Jingbo Niu and Margaret Clancy and Piran Aliabadi and Burton Sack and Ali Guermazi and Hunter, {David J.} and Shreyasee Amin and Gail Rogers and Booth, {Sarah L.}",
year = "2007",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1002/art.22292",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "56",
pages = "129--136",
journal = "Arthritis and Rheumatology",
issn = "2326-5191",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Low levels of vitamin D and worsening of knee osteoarthritis

T2 - Results of two longitudinal studies

AU - Felson, David T.

AU - Niu, Jingbo

AU - Clancy, Margaret

AU - Aliabadi, Piran

AU - Sack, Burton

AU - Guermazi, Ali

AU - Hunter, David J.

AU - Amin, Shreyasee

AU - Rogers, Gail

AU - Booth, Sarah L.

PY - 2007/1

Y1 - 2007/1

N2 - Objective. To confirm reports that 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with an increased risk of joint space narrowing or cartilage loss in osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. We measured 25(OH)D levels in subjects from 2 longitudinal cohort studies, the Framingham Osteoarthritis Study and the Boston Osteoarthritis of the Knee Study (BOKS). In the first, weight-bearing anteroposterior (AP) and lateral knee radiographs were obtained on subjects in 1993-1994 and again in 2002-2005 (mean interval 9 years); blood was drawn for measurement of vitamin D status in 1996-2000. In the second, subjects with symptomatic knee OA participating in a natural history study had fluoroscopically positioned semiflexed posteroanterior (PA) and lateral radiography of both knees and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the more symptomatic knee performed at baseline and at 15 and 30 months. Blood was drawn at all visits, and the baseline specimen was used when available. In both studies, we defined radiographic worsening based on joint space loss in the tibiofemoral joint on either AP/PA or lateral weight-bearing views, using a semiquantitative scale (worsening defined as increase by ≥1 on a 0-3 scale). In the BOKS, we evaluated cartilage loss semiquantitatively, using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score. In both studies, 25(OH)D levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Analyses focused on whether vitamin D levels, defined in tertiles or as deficient (25[OH]D <20 ng/ml) versus nondeficient, predicted worsening of OA. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, body mass index, sex, and baseline OA level was used. Results. The 715 subjects in the Framingham Study had a mean 25(OH)D level of 20 ng/ml at baseline, and 20.3% of the knees showed worsening, during the course of the study, with most knees having had no evidence of OA at baseline. The 277 subjects with OA in the BOKS had a mean 25(OH)D level of 20 ng/ml at baseline with 23.6% of knees showing radiographic worsening. We found no association of baseline 25(OH)D levels with radiographic worsening in either cohort, and confidence limits in the analyses of vitamin D deficiency were narrow, suggesting that results were not based on insufficient power. In fact, the risk of worsening was slightly, but not significantly, lower in persons with low levels of vitamin D than in persons with higher levels. In the BOKS, vitamin D levels were unrelated to cartilage loss seen on MRI. Conclusion. The findings indicate that vitamin D status is unrelated to the risk of joint space or cartilage loss in knee OA.

AB - Objective. To confirm reports that 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with an increased risk of joint space narrowing or cartilage loss in osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. We measured 25(OH)D levels in subjects from 2 longitudinal cohort studies, the Framingham Osteoarthritis Study and the Boston Osteoarthritis of the Knee Study (BOKS). In the first, weight-bearing anteroposterior (AP) and lateral knee radiographs were obtained on subjects in 1993-1994 and again in 2002-2005 (mean interval 9 years); blood was drawn for measurement of vitamin D status in 1996-2000. In the second, subjects with symptomatic knee OA participating in a natural history study had fluoroscopically positioned semiflexed posteroanterior (PA) and lateral radiography of both knees and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the more symptomatic knee performed at baseline and at 15 and 30 months. Blood was drawn at all visits, and the baseline specimen was used when available. In both studies, we defined radiographic worsening based on joint space loss in the tibiofemoral joint on either AP/PA or lateral weight-bearing views, using a semiquantitative scale (worsening defined as increase by ≥1 on a 0-3 scale). In the BOKS, we evaluated cartilage loss semiquantitatively, using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score. In both studies, 25(OH)D levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Analyses focused on whether vitamin D levels, defined in tertiles or as deficient (25[OH]D <20 ng/ml) versus nondeficient, predicted worsening of OA. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, body mass index, sex, and baseline OA level was used. Results. The 715 subjects in the Framingham Study had a mean 25(OH)D level of 20 ng/ml at baseline, and 20.3% of the knees showed worsening, during the course of the study, with most knees having had no evidence of OA at baseline. The 277 subjects with OA in the BOKS had a mean 25(OH)D level of 20 ng/ml at baseline with 23.6% of knees showing radiographic worsening. We found no association of baseline 25(OH)D levels with radiographic worsening in either cohort, and confidence limits in the analyses of vitamin D deficiency were narrow, suggesting that results were not based on insufficient power. In fact, the risk of worsening was slightly, but not significantly, lower in persons with low levels of vitamin D than in persons with higher levels. In the BOKS, vitamin D levels were unrelated to cartilage loss seen on MRI. Conclusion. The findings indicate that vitamin D status is unrelated to the risk of joint space or cartilage loss in knee OA.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33846201621&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33846201621&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/art.22292

DO - 10.1002/art.22292

M3 - Article

C2 - 17195215

AN - SCOPUS:33846201621

VL - 56

SP - 129

EP - 136

JO - Arthritis and Rheumatology

JF - Arthritis and Rheumatology

SN - 2326-5191

IS - 1

ER -