Low-grade glial neoplasms and intractable partial epilepsy: Efficacy of surgical treatment

J. W. Britton, Gregory D Cascino, F. W. Sharbrough, P. J. Kelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

110 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We performed a retrospective study of 51 consecutive patients who underwent operation for intractable partial epilepsy related to low-grade intracerebral neoplasms between 1984 and 1990. All patients had medically refractory partial seizures and a mass lesion identified on neuroimaging studies. Lesionectomy was performed on 17 patients, and 34 had lesion resection and corticectomy. Mean postoperative follow-up was 4.4 years (range 2-8 years). Sixty-six percent of patients were seizure-free, and 88% experienced a significant reduction in seizure frequency. In 16 patients (31%), antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were successfully discontinued. Twenty- five of 31 (81%) eligible patients obtained a driver's license after successful operation. Patients with complete tumor resection and no interictal epileptiform activity on postoperative EEG studies had the best operative outcome. Epilepsy surgery can result in long-term improvement in seizure control and quality of life (QOL) in selected patients with intractable tumor-related epilepsy. Our results should be useful to clinicians considering treatment options for patients with intractable seizures related to low-grade intracerebral neoplasms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1130-1135
Number of pages6
JournalEpilepsia
Volume35
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Partial Epilepsy
Neuroglia
Seizures
Neoplasms
Epilepsy
Drug Resistant Epilepsy
Licensure
Neuroimaging
Anticonvulsants
Electroencephalography
Retrospective Studies
Quality of Life

Keywords

  • Brain neoplasms
  • Epilepsy surgery
  • Gliomas
  • Intractable epilepsy
  • Lesional epilepsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Low-grade glial neoplasms and intractable partial epilepsy : Efficacy of surgical treatment. / Britton, J. W.; Cascino, Gregory D; Sharbrough, F. W.; Kelly, P. J.

In: Epilepsia, Vol. 35, No. 6, 1994, p. 1130-1135.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Britton, J. W. ; Cascino, Gregory D ; Sharbrough, F. W. ; Kelly, P. J. / Low-grade glial neoplasms and intractable partial epilepsy : Efficacy of surgical treatment. In: Epilepsia. 1994 ; Vol. 35, No. 6. pp. 1130-1135.
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