Loss of interstitial cells of Cajal and inhibitory innervation in insulin-dependent diabetes

C. Liang He, Edy E. Soffer, Christopher D. Ferris, R. Matthew Walsh, Joseph H. Szurszewski, Gianrico Farrugia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background & Aims: Gastrointestinal complications of long-standing diabetes include nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and constipation. The pathophysiology underlying these symptoms is poorly understood. Recent evidence suggests an important role for interstitial cells of Cajal in controlling gastrointestinal motility. The aim of this study was to determine changes in interstitial cells of Cajal and enteric innervation in a patient with insulin-dependent diabetes. Methods: A full thickness jejunal biopsy was obtained from a 38-year-old insulin-dependent diabetic with evidence for diabetic gastroenteropathy. Immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, and 3-dimensional reconstruction techniques were used to quantify changes in the volume of interstitial cells of Cajal and enteric innervation. Results: Interstitial cells of Cajal were markedly decreased throughout the entire thickness of the jejunum. A decrease in neuronal nitric oxide synthase, vasoactive intestinal peptide, PACAP, and tyrosine hydroxylase immunopositive nerve fibers was observed in circular muscle layer while substance P immunoreactivity was increased. Conclusions: The data suggest that long-standing diabetes is associated with a decrease in interstitial cells of Cajal volume and a decrease in inhibitory innervation, associated with an increase in excitatory innervation. The changes in interstitial cells of Cajal volume and enteric nerves may underlie the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal complications associated with diabetes and suggest future therapeutic targets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)427-434
Number of pages8
JournalGastroenterology
Volume121
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2001

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Interstitial Cells of Cajal
Insulin
Cell Size
Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type I
Gastrointestinal Motility
Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide
Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase
Jejunum
Constipation
Substance P
Nerve Fibers
Confocal Microscopy
Nausea
Abdominal Pain
Vomiting
Diarrhea
Immunohistochemistry
Biopsy
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

He, C. L., Soffer, E. E., Ferris, C. D., Walsh, R. M., Szurszewski, J. H., & Farrugia, G. (2001). Loss of interstitial cells of Cajal and inhibitory innervation in insulin-dependent diabetes. Gastroenterology, 121(2), 427-434.

Loss of interstitial cells of Cajal and inhibitory innervation in insulin-dependent diabetes. / He, C. Liang; Soffer, Edy E.; Ferris, Christopher D.; Walsh, R. Matthew; Szurszewski, Joseph H.; Farrugia, Gianrico.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 121, No. 2, 2001, p. 427-434.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

He, CL, Soffer, EE, Ferris, CD, Walsh, RM, Szurszewski, JH & Farrugia, G 2001, 'Loss of interstitial cells of Cajal and inhibitory innervation in insulin-dependent diabetes', Gastroenterology, vol. 121, no. 2, pp. 427-434.
He, C. Liang ; Soffer, Edy E. ; Ferris, Christopher D. ; Walsh, R. Matthew ; Szurszewski, Joseph H. ; Farrugia, Gianrico. / Loss of interstitial cells of Cajal and inhibitory innervation in insulin-dependent diabetes. In: Gastroenterology. 2001 ; Vol. 121, No. 2. pp. 427-434.
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