Longitudinal tracking of muscle sympathetic nerve activity and its relationship with blood pressure in subjects with prehypertension

Dagmara Hering, Tomas Kara, Wiesława Kucharska, Virend Somers, Krzysztof Narkiewicz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prehypertension is associated with increased cardiovascular events. While the “tracking phenomenon” is an important longitudinal characteristic of blood pressure (BP), changes in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) over time remain unclear. This study tested the hypothesis that MSNA tracking contributes to BP trends in prehypertension. BP and MSNA were assessed in 13 prehypertensive males at rest, during hand grip and mental stressors at baseline and after 8 years. Baseline office BP averaged 127 ± 2/81 ± 2 mmHg and MSNA 24 ± 4 bursts/min. BP increased by 7 ± 2/5 ± 2 mmHg (P 

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalBlood Pressure
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Dec 10 2015

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Prehypertension
Blood Pressure
Muscles
Hand Strength
Hand

Keywords

  • Heart-rate variability
  • laboratory stressors
  • muscle sympathetic nerve activity
  • prehypertension
  • pulse wave velocity
  • tracking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Longitudinal tracking of muscle sympathetic nerve activity and its relationship with blood pressure in subjects with prehypertension. / Hering, Dagmara; Kara, Tomas; Kucharska, Wiesława; Somers, Virend; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof.

In: Blood Pressure, 10.12.2015, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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