Long-term safety of nebulized lidocaine for adults with difficult-to-control chronic cough

A case series

Kaiser G. Lim, Matthew A Rank, Peter Y. Hahn, Karina A. Keogh, Timothy Ian Morgenthaler, Eric J. Olson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The long-term safety of patient-administered nebulized lidocaine for control of chronic cough has not been established. Methods: We performed a retrospective study of adults who received a prescription and nurse education for nebulized lidocaine for chronic cough between 2002 and 2007. A survey questionnaire inquiring about adverse reactions and the effectiveness of nebulized lidocaine was developed and administered to these individuals after the nebulized lidocaine trial. We conducted two mailings and a postmailing phone follow-up to nonresponders. When adverse events were reported in the questionnaire response, a structured phone interview was conducted to obtain additional details. Results: Of 165 eligible patients, 99 (60%) responded to the survey. Responders were a median age of 62 years (range, 29-87 years); 77 (79%) were women, and 80 (82%) were white. The median duration of cough was 5 years before treatment with nebulized lidocaine. Of the patients who used nebulized lidocaine (93% of survey responders), 43% reported an adverse event. However, none of these events required an emergency visit, hospitalization, or antibiotic therapy for aspiration pneumonia. The mean (SD) of the pretreatment cough severity score was 8.4 (1.6) and posttreatment was 5.9 (3.4) (P,<.001). Of the patients reporting improvement in cough symptoms (49%), 80% reported improvement within the first 2 weeks. Conclusions: Adults tolerated self-administration of nebulized lidocaine for difficult-to-control chronic cough. No serious adverse effects occurred while providing symptomatic control in 49% of patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1060-1065
Number of pages6
JournalChest
Volume143
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013

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Lidocaine
Cough
Safety
Aspiration Pneumonia
Self Administration
Patient Safety
Prescriptions
Hospitalization
Emergencies
Retrospective Studies
Nurses
Interviews
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Long-term safety of nebulized lidocaine for adults with difficult-to-control chronic cough : A case series. / Lim, Kaiser G.; Rank, Matthew A; Hahn, Peter Y.; Keogh, Karina A.; Morgenthaler, Timothy Ian; Olson, Eric J.

In: Chest, Vol. 143, No. 4, 04.2013, p. 1060-1065.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lim, Kaiser G. ; Rank, Matthew A ; Hahn, Peter Y. ; Keogh, Karina A. ; Morgenthaler, Timothy Ian ; Olson, Eric J. / Long-term safety of nebulized lidocaine for adults with difficult-to-control chronic cough : A case series. In: Chest. 2013 ; Vol. 143, No. 4. pp. 1060-1065.
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