Long-term risk of myocardial infarction and stroke in bipolar i disorder

A population-based Cohort Study

Miguel L. Prieto, Louis A. Schenck, Jennifer L. Kruse, James P. Klaas, Alanna Chamberlain, William V Bobo, Frank Bellivier, Marion Leboyer, Veronique Lee Roger, Robert D Jr. Brown, Walter A Rocca, Mark A Frye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives To estimate the risk of fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke in patients with bipolar I disorder compared to people without bipolar I disorder. Method Utilizing a records-linkage system spanning 30 years (1966-1996), a population-based cohort of 334 subjects with bipolar I disorder and 334 age and sex-matched referents from Olmsted County, Minnesota, U.S. was identified. Longitudinal follow-up continued until incident MI or stroke (confirmed by board-certified cardiologist/neurologist), death, or study end date (December 31, 2013). Cox proportional hazards models assessed the hazard ratio (HR) for MI or stroke, adjusting for potential confounders. Results There was an increased risk of fatal or non-fatal MI or stroke (as a composite outcome) in patients with bipolar I disorder [HR 1.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02, 2.33; p=0.04]. However, after adjusting for baseline cardiovascular risk factors (alcoholism, hypertension, diabetes, and smoking), the risk was no longer significantly increased (HR 1.19, 95% CI 0.76, 1.86; p=0.46). Limitations Small sample size for the study design. Findings were not retained after adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk factors. Psychotropic medication use during the follow-up was not ascertained and was not included in the analyses. Conclusion This study in a geographically defined region in the U.S. demonstrated a significant increased risk of MI or stroke in bipolar I disorder, which was no longer significant after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-127
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume194
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

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Bipolar Disorder
Cohort Studies
Stroke
Myocardial Infarction
Population
Confidence Intervals
Proportional Hazards Models
Sample Size
Alcoholism
Cardiovascular Diseases
Smoking
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Bipolar disorder
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Cohort studies
  • Risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Long-term risk of myocardial infarction and stroke in bipolar i disorder : A population-based Cohort Study. / Prieto, Miguel L.; Schenck, Louis A.; Kruse, Jennifer L.; Klaas, James P.; Chamberlain, Alanna; Bobo, William V; Bellivier, Frank; Leboyer, Marion; Roger, Veronique Lee; Brown, Robert D Jr.; Rocca, Walter A; Frye, Mark A.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 194, 01.04.2016, p. 120-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objectives To estimate the risk of fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke in patients with bipolar I disorder compared to people without bipolar I disorder. Method Utilizing a records-linkage system spanning 30 years (1966-1996), a population-based cohort of 334 subjects with bipolar I disorder and 334 age and sex-matched referents from Olmsted County, Minnesota, U.S. was identified. Longitudinal follow-up continued until incident MI or stroke (confirmed by board-certified cardiologist/neurologist), death, or study end date (December 31, 2013). Cox proportional hazards models assessed the hazard ratio (HR) for MI or stroke, adjusting for potential confounders. Results There was an increased risk of fatal or non-fatal MI or stroke (as a composite outcome) in patients with bipolar I disorder [HR 1.54, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 1.02, 2.33; p=0.04]. However, after adjusting for baseline cardiovascular risk factors (alcoholism, hypertension, diabetes, and smoking), the risk was no longer significantly increased (HR 1.19, 95{\%} CI 0.76, 1.86; p=0.46). Limitations Small sample size for the study design. Findings were not retained after adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk factors. Psychotropic medication use during the follow-up was not ascertained and was not included in the analyses. Conclusion This study in a geographically defined region in the U.S. demonstrated a significant increased risk of MI or stroke in bipolar I disorder, which was no longer significant after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors.",
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AU - Prieto, Miguel L.

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AU - Klaas, James P.

AU - Chamberlain, Alanna

AU - Bobo, William V

AU - Bellivier, Frank

AU - Leboyer, Marion

AU - Roger, Veronique Lee

AU - Brown, Robert D Jr.

AU - Rocca, Walter A

AU - Frye, Mark A

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N2 - Objectives To estimate the risk of fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke in patients with bipolar I disorder compared to people without bipolar I disorder. Method Utilizing a records-linkage system spanning 30 years (1966-1996), a population-based cohort of 334 subjects with bipolar I disorder and 334 age and sex-matched referents from Olmsted County, Minnesota, U.S. was identified. Longitudinal follow-up continued until incident MI or stroke (confirmed by board-certified cardiologist/neurologist), death, or study end date (December 31, 2013). Cox proportional hazards models assessed the hazard ratio (HR) for MI or stroke, adjusting for potential confounders. Results There was an increased risk of fatal or non-fatal MI or stroke (as a composite outcome) in patients with bipolar I disorder [HR 1.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02, 2.33; p=0.04]. However, after adjusting for baseline cardiovascular risk factors (alcoholism, hypertension, diabetes, and smoking), the risk was no longer significantly increased (HR 1.19, 95% CI 0.76, 1.86; p=0.46). Limitations Small sample size for the study design. Findings were not retained after adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk factors. Psychotropic medication use during the follow-up was not ascertained and was not included in the analyses. Conclusion This study in a geographically defined region in the U.S. demonstrated a significant increased risk of MI or stroke in bipolar I disorder, which was no longer significant after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors.

AB - Objectives To estimate the risk of fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke in patients with bipolar I disorder compared to people without bipolar I disorder. Method Utilizing a records-linkage system spanning 30 years (1966-1996), a population-based cohort of 334 subjects with bipolar I disorder and 334 age and sex-matched referents from Olmsted County, Minnesota, U.S. was identified. Longitudinal follow-up continued until incident MI or stroke (confirmed by board-certified cardiologist/neurologist), death, or study end date (December 31, 2013). Cox proportional hazards models assessed the hazard ratio (HR) for MI or stroke, adjusting for potential confounders. Results There was an increased risk of fatal or non-fatal MI or stroke (as a composite outcome) in patients with bipolar I disorder [HR 1.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02, 2.33; p=0.04]. However, after adjusting for baseline cardiovascular risk factors (alcoholism, hypertension, diabetes, and smoking), the risk was no longer significantly increased (HR 1.19, 95% CI 0.76, 1.86; p=0.46). Limitations Small sample size for the study design. Findings were not retained after adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk factors. Psychotropic medication use during the follow-up was not ascertained and was not included in the analyses. Conclusion This study in a geographically defined region in the U.S. demonstrated a significant increased risk of MI or stroke in bipolar I disorder, which was no longer significant after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors.

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