Long-term risk of depressive and anxiety symptoms after early bilateral oophorectomy

Walter A Rocca, Brandon R. Grossardt, Yonas Endale Geda, Bobbie S. Gostout, James Howard Bower, Demetrius M. Maraganore, Mariza De Andrade, L. Joseph Melton

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We studied the long-term risk of depressive and anxiety symptoms in women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before menopause.

DESIGN: We conducted a cohort study among all women residing in Olmsted County, MN, who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before the onset of menopause for a noncancer indication from 1950 through 1987. Each member of the bilateral oophorectomy cohort was matched by age with a referent woman from the same population who had not undergone an oophorectomy. In total, we studied 666 women with bilateral oophorectomy and 673 referent women. Women were followed for a median of 24 years, and depressive and anxiety symptoms were assessed using a structured questionnaire via a direct or proxy telephone interview performed from 2001 through 2006.

RESULTS: Women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before the onset of menopause had an increased risk of depressive symptoms diagnosed by a physician (hazard ratio = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.04-2.26, adjusted for age, education, and type of interview) and of anxiety symptoms (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.29, 95% CI: 1.33-3.95) compared with referent women. The findings remained consistent after excluding depressive or anxiety symptoms that first occurred within 10 years after oophorectomy. The associations were greater with younger age at oophorectomy but did not vary across indications for the oophorectomy. In addition, treatment with estrogen to age 50 years in women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy at younger ages did not modify the risk.

CONCLUSIONS: Bilateral oophorectomy performed before the onset of menopause is associated with an increased long-term risk of depressive and anxiety symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1275-1285
Number of pages11
JournalMenopause (New York, N.Y.)
Volume25
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

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Ovariectomy
Anxiety
Depression
Menopause
Interviews
Proxy
Estrogens
Cohort Studies
Physicians
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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Long-term risk of depressive and anxiety symptoms after early bilateral oophorectomy. / Rocca, Walter A; Grossardt, Brandon R.; Geda, Yonas Endale; Gostout, Bobbie S.; Bower, James Howard; Maraganore, Demetrius M.; De Andrade, Mariza; Melton, L. Joseph.

In: Menopause (New York, N.Y.), Vol. 25, No. 11, 01.11.2018, p. 1275-1285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rocca, Walter A ; Grossardt, Brandon R. ; Geda, Yonas Endale ; Gostout, Bobbie S. ; Bower, James Howard ; Maraganore, Demetrius M. ; De Andrade, Mariza ; Melton, L. Joseph. / Long-term risk of depressive and anxiety symptoms after early bilateral oophorectomy. In: Menopause (New York, N.Y.). 2018 ; Vol. 25, No. 11. pp. 1275-1285.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: We studied the long-term risk of depressive and anxiety symptoms in women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before menopause.DESIGN: We conducted a cohort study among all women residing in Olmsted County, MN, who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before the onset of menopause for a noncancer indication from 1950 through 1987. Each member of the bilateral oophorectomy cohort was matched by age with a referent woman from the same population who had not undergone an oophorectomy. In total, we studied 666 women with bilateral oophorectomy and 673 referent women. Women were followed for a median of 24 years, and depressive and anxiety symptoms were assessed using a structured questionnaire via a direct or proxy telephone interview performed from 2001 through 2006.RESULTS: Women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before the onset of menopause had an increased risk of depressive symptoms diagnosed by a physician (hazard ratio = 1.54, 95{\%} CI: 1.04-2.26, adjusted for age, education, and type of interview) and of anxiety symptoms (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.29, 95{\%} CI: 1.33-3.95) compared with referent women. The findings remained consistent after excluding depressive or anxiety symptoms that first occurred within 10 years after oophorectomy. The associations were greater with younger age at oophorectomy but did not vary across indications for the oophorectomy. In addition, treatment with estrogen to age 50 years in women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy at younger ages did not modify the risk.CONCLUSIONS: Bilateral oophorectomy performed before the onset of menopause is associated with an increased long-term risk of depressive and anxiety symptoms.",
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T1 - Long-term risk of depressive and anxiety symptoms after early bilateral oophorectomy

AU - Rocca, Walter A

AU - Grossardt, Brandon R.

AU - Geda, Yonas Endale

AU - Gostout, Bobbie S.

AU - Bower, James Howard

AU - Maraganore, Demetrius M.

AU - De Andrade, Mariza

AU - Melton, L. Joseph

PY - 2018/11/1

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: We studied the long-term risk of depressive and anxiety symptoms in women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before menopause.DESIGN: We conducted a cohort study among all women residing in Olmsted County, MN, who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before the onset of menopause for a noncancer indication from 1950 through 1987. Each member of the bilateral oophorectomy cohort was matched by age with a referent woman from the same population who had not undergone an oophorectomy. In total, we studied 666 women with bilateral oophorectomy and 673 referent women. Women were followed for a median of 24 years, and depressive and anxiety symptoms were assessed using a structured questionnaire via a direct or proxy telephone interview performed from 2001 through 2006.RESULTS: Women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before the onset of menopause had an increased risk of depressive symptoms diagnosed by a physician (hazard ratio = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.04-2.26, adjusted for age, education, and type of interview) and of anxiety symptoms (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.29, 95% CI: 1.33-3.95) compared with referent women. The findings remained consistent after excluding depressive or anxiety symptoms that first occurred within 10 years after oophorectomy. The associations were greater with younger age at oophorectomy but did not vary across indications for the oophorectomy. In addition, treatment with estrogen to age 50 years in women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy at younger ages did not modify the risk.CONCLUSIONS: Bilateral oophorectomy performed before the onset of menopause is associated with an increased long-term risk of depressive and anxiety symptoms.

AB - OBJECTIVE: We studied the long-term risk of depressive and anxiety symptoms in women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before menopause.DESIGN: We conducted a cohort study among all women residing in Olmsted County, MN, who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before the onset of menopause for a noncancer indication from 1950 through 1987. Each member of the bilateral oophorectomy cohort was matched by age with a referent woman from the same population who had not undergone an oophorectomy. In total, we studied 666 women with bilateral oophorectomy and 673 referent women. Women were followed for a median of 24 years, and depressive and anxiety symptoms were assessed using a structured questionnaire via a direct or proxy telephone interview performed from 2001 through 2006.RESULTS: Women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before the onset of menopause had an increased risk of depressive symptoms diagnosed by a physician (hazard ratio = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.04-2.26, adjusted for age, education, and type of interview) and of anxiety symptoms (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.29, 95% CI: 1.33-3.95) compared with referent women. The findings remained consistent after excluding depressive or anxiety symptoms that first occurred within 10 years after oophorectomy. The associations were greater with younger age at oophorectomy but did not vary across indications for the oophorectomy. In addition, treatment with estrogen to age 50 years in women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy at younger ages did not modify the risk.CONCLUSIONS: Bilateral oophorectomy performed before the onset of menopause is associated with an increased long-term risk of depressive and anxiety symptoms.

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