Long-term quality of life in young adults treated for oral cavity squamous cell cancer

Ligy Thomas, Eric J. Moore, Kerry D. Olsen, Jan Kasperbauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: We assessed the long-term quality of life (QOL) in patients who survived oral cavity squamous cell cancer when they were young and looked for any clinical factors that might adversely affect function and QOL. Methods: We performed a retrospective case series and questionnaire survey in a tertiary care center. The subjects were consecutive patients treated for oral cancers during a 25-year period, when they were 40 years of age or less. The patients completed the University of Washington Quality of Life questionnaire and the M. D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI). We made an overall descriptive report of swallowing and QOL measures in the study population and looked for any clinical factors associated with functional outcomes. Results: Among the 62 patients treated over the course of 25 years, 46 were alive and disease-free. Twenty-six participated. The median follow-up duration was 14.7 years (range, 3 to 27 years). Age at diagnosis and duration of follow-up did not correlate with overall QOL or health-related QOL. Seventy-seven percent rated their overall QOL as outstanding, very good, or good. The key domains affected by cancer were appearance, mood, saliva, and shoulder function. Radiotherapy significantly adversely affected the QOL. The median MDADI scores on all 4 subscales were at least 85%. Higher T-stage and radiotherapy were significantly associated with lower scores on all subscales. Conclusions: The long-term health-related QOL in this cohort was quite good. Radiotherapy and tumor stage correlated with swallowing outcomes, and only radiotherapy seemed to adversely affect the overall QOL.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)395-401
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology
Volume121
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Squamous Cell Neoplasms
Mouth
Young Adult
Quality of Life
Radiotherapy
Deglutition
Deglutition Disorders
Equipment and Supplies
Mouth Neoplasms
Saliva
Tertiary Care Centers
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Long-term quality of life
  • M. D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory
  • MDADI
  • Oral cancer
  • Swallowing function
  • University of Washington Quality of Life questionnaire
  • UW-QOL
  • Young adult

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Long-term quality of life in young adults treated for oral cavity squamous cell cancer. / Thomas, Ligy; Moore, Eric J.; Olsen, Kerry D.; Kasperbauer, Jan.

In: Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology, Vol. 121, No. 6, 01.01.2012, p. 395-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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