Long-term outcome of patients transplanted with livers from hepatitis C- positive donors

Giuliano Testa, Robert M. Goldstein, George Netto, Osman Abbasoglu, Barbara K. Brooks, Marlon F. Levy, Bo S. Husberg, Thomas A. Gonwa, Goran B. Klintmalm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. The use of hepatitis C serology-positive donors has become an option in patients affected by hepatitis C (Hep C) end-stage liver disease. Previous studies with less than 1 year of follow-up have suggested that there is no difference in early patient and graft survival. The aim of our review is to confirm with a longer follow-up (a minimum of 1 year) that the use of these organs is safe and that patient and graft survival are comparable to those of patients with Hep C who received Hep C-negative grafts. Methods. Between 1985 and 1995, 213 patients were transplanted with a diagnosis of Hep C. Seventy-six patients were excluded from the study, 47 for insufficient follow-up and 29 because the diagnosis of recurrence was not certain. Twenty-two patients received Hep C+ donor grafts and 115 patients received Hep C-donor grafts. These two groups were evaluated to assess the rate and severity of recurrence by serial biopsies and to assess patient and graft survival. Results. Recurrent Hep C was documented by biopsy in 12 of 22 patients who received Hep C+ donor grafts. Of these 12 patients, 9 had mild chronic hepatitis, 2 had fibrosis, and 1 had cirrhosis. Ten of the 22 patients had normal biopsies. Of the patients who received Hep C- grafts, 48 of 115 had recurrent disease. Of these 48 patients, 28 had mild chronic hepatitis, 15 had fibrosis, and 10 had cirrhosis. Sixty-seven of 115 had normal biopsies. The recurrence rate was 54.55% in the Hep C+ donor grafts and 41.74% in the Hep C- donor grafts (P=NS). Patient and graft survival at 4 years after transplant were 83.9% and 71.9% in the Hep C + donor grafts and 79.1% and 76.2% in the Hep C- donor grafts, respectively (P=NS). Conclusions. Our study suggests that Hep C+ donors can be used with excellent long-term results and that the progression of the recurrent disease does not seem to be affected by the pre-existence of the Hep C virus in the donor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)925-929
Number of pages5
JournalTransplantation
Volume65
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Hepatitis C
Tissue Donors
Liver
Transplants
Graft Survival
Fibrosis
Biopsy
Chronic Hepatitis
Recurrence
End Stage Liver Disease
Serology
Hepacivirus
Disease Progression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Immunology

Cite this

Testa, G., Goldstein, R. M., Netto, G., Abbasoglu, O., Brooks, B. K., Levy, M. F., ... Klintmalm, G. B. (1998). Long-term outcome of patients transplanted with livers from hepatitis C- positive donors. Transplantation, 65(7), 925-929. https://doi.org/10.1097/00007890-199804150-00011

Long-term outcome of patients transplanted with livers from hepatitis C- positive donors. / Testa, Giuliano; Goldstein, Robert M.; Netto, George; Abbasoglu, Osman; Brooks, Barbara K.; Levy, Marlon F.; Husberg, Bo S.; Gonwa, Thomas A.; Klintmalm, Goran B.

In: Transplantation, Vol. 65, No. 7, 15.04.1998, p. 925-929.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Testa, G, Goldstein, RM, Netto, G, Abbasoglu, O, Brooks, BK, Levy, MF, Husberg, BS, Gonwa, TA & Klintmalm, GB 1998, 'Long-term outcome of patients transplanted with livers from hepatitis C- positive donors', Transplantation, vol. 65, no. 7, pp. 925-929. https://doi.org/10.1097/00007890-199804150-00011
Testa G, Goldstein RM, Netto G, Abbasoglu O, Brooks BK, Levy MF et al. Long-term outcome of patients transplanted with livers from hepatitis C- positive donors. Transplantation. 1998 Apr 15;65(7):925-929. https://doi.org/10.1097/00007890-199804150-00011
Testa, Giuliano ; Goldstein, Robert M. ; Netto, George ; Abbasoglu, Osman ; Brooks, Barbara K. ; Levy, Marlon F. ; Husberg, Bo S. ; Gonwa, Thomas A. ; Klintmalm, Goran B. / Long-term outcome of patients transplanted with livers from hepatitis C- positive donors. In: Transplantation. 1998 ; Vol. 65, No. 7. pp. 925-929.
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abstract = "Background. The use of hepatitis C serology-positive donors has become an option in patients affected by hepatitis C (Hep C) end-stage liver disease. Previous studies with less than 1 year of follow-up have suggested that there is no difference in early patient and graft survival. The aim of our review is to confirm with a longer follow-up (a minimum of 1 year) that the use of these organs is safe and that patient and graft survival are comparable to those of patients with Hep C who received Hep C-negative grafts. Methods. Between 1985 and 1995, 213 patients were transplanted with a diagnosis of Hep C. Seventy-six patients were excluded from the study, 47 for insufficient follow-up and 29 because the diagnosis of recurrence was not certain. Twenty-two patients received Hep C+ donor grafts and 115 patients received Hep C-donor grafts. These two groups were evaluated to assess the rate and severity of recurrence by serial biopsies and to assess patient and graft survival. Results. Recurrent Hep C was documented by biopsy in 12 of 22 patients who received Hep C+ donor grafts. Of these 12 patients, 9 had mild chronic hepatitis, 2 had fibrosis, and 1 had cirrhosis. Ten of the 22 patients had normal biopsies. Of the patients who received Hep C- grafts, 48 of 115 had recurrent disease. Of these 48 patients, 28 had mild chronic hepatitis, 15 had fibrosis, and 10 had cirrhosis. Sixty-seven of 115 had normal biopsies. The recurrence rate was 54.55{\%} in the Hep C+ donor grafts and 41.74{\%} in the Hep C- donor grafts (P=NS). Patient and graft survival at 4 years after transplant were 83.9{\%} and 71.9{\%} in the Hep C + donor grafts and 79.1{\%} and 76.2{\%} in the Hep C- donor grafts, respectively (P=NS). Conclusions. Our study suggests that Hep C+ donors can be used with excellent long-term results and that the progression of the recurrent disease does not seem to be affected by the pre-existence of the Hep C virus in the donor.",
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AU - Goldstein, Robert M.

AU - Netto, George

AU - Abbasoglu, Osman

AU - Brooks, Barbara K.

AU - Levy, Marlon F.

AU - Husberg, Bo S.

AU - Gonwa, Thomas A.

AU - Klintmalm, Goran B.

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N2 - Background. The use of hepatitis C serology-positive donors has become an option in patients affected by hepatitis C (Hep C) end-stage liver disease. Previous studies with less than 1 year of follow-up have suggested that there is no difference in early patient and graft survival. The aim of our review is to confirm with a longer follow-up (a minimum of 1 year) that the use of these organs is safe and that patient and graft survival are comparable to those of patients with Hep C who received Hep C-negative grafts. Methods. Between 1985 and 1995, 213 patients were transplanted with a diagnosis of Hep C. Seventy-six patients were excluded from the study, 47 for insufficient follow-up and 29 because the diagnosis of recurrence was not certain. Twenty-two patients received Hep C+ donor grafts and 115 patients received Hep C-donor grafts. These two groups were evaluated to assess the rate and severity of recurrence by serial biopsies and to assess patient and graft survival. Results. Recurrent Hep C was documented by biopsy in 12 of 22 patients who received Hep C+ donor grafts. Of these 12 patients, 9 had mild chronic hepatitis, 2 had fibrosis, and 1 had cirrhosis. Ten of the 22 patients had normal biopsies. Of the patients who received Hep C- grafts, 48 of 115 had recurrent disease. Of these 48 patients, 28 had mild chronic hepatitis, 15 had fibrosis, and 10 had cirrhosis. Sixty-seven of 115 had normal biopsies. The recurrence rate was 54.55% in the Hep C+ donor grafts and 41.74% in the Hep C- donor grafts (P=NS). Patient and graft survival at 4 years after transplant were 83.9% and 71.9% in the Hep C + donor grafts and 79.1% and 76.2% in the Hep C- donor grafts, respectively (P=NS). Conclusions. Our study suggests that Hep C+ donors can be used with excellent long-term results and that the progression of the recurrent disease does not seem to be affected by the pre-existence of the Hep C virus in the donor.

AB - Background. The use of hepatitis C serology-positive donors has become an option in patients affected by hepatitis C (Hep C) end-stage liver disease. Previous studies with less than 1 year of follow-up have suggested that there is no difference in early patient and graft survival. The aim of our review is to confirm with a longer follow-up (a minimum of 1 year) that the use of these organs is safe and that patient and graft survival are comparable to those of patients with Hep C who received Hep C-negative grafts. Methods. Between 1985 and 1995, 213 patients were transplanted with a diagnosis of Hep C. Seventy-six patients were excluded from the study, 47 for insufficient follow-up and 29 because the diagnosis of recurrence was not certain. Twenty-two patients received Hep C+ donor grafts and 115 patients received Hep C-donor grafts. These two groups were evaluated to assess the rate and severity of recurrence by serial biopsies and to assess patient and graft survival. Results. Recurrent Hep C was documented by biopsy in 12 of 22 patients who received Hep C+ donor grafts. Of these 12 patients, 9 had mild chronic hepatitis, 2 had fibrosis, and 1 had cirrhosis. Ten of the 22 patients had normal biopsies. Of the patients who received Hep C- grafts, 48 of 115 had recurrent disease. Of these 48 patients, 28 had mild chronic hepatitis, 15 had fibrosis, and 10 had cirrhosis. Sixty-seven of 115 had normal biopsies. The recurrence rate was 54.55% in the Hep C+ donor grafts and 41.74% in the Hep C- donor grafts (P=NS). Patient and graft survival at 4 years after transplant were 83.9% and 71.9% in the Hep C + donor grafts and 79.1% and 76.2% in the Hep C- donor grafts, respectively (P=NS). Conclusions. Our study suggests that Hep C+ donors can be used with excellent long-term results and that the progression of the recurrent disease does not seem to be affected by the pre-existence of the Hep C virus in the donor.

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