Long-Term Outcome in Patients With Transient Global Amnesia: A Population-Based Study

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Abstract

Objective To study the long-term risk of cerebrovascular events, seizures, and cognitive impairment in patients with transient global amnesia (TGA). Patients and Methods Data for all patients diagnosed with possible TGA in Olmsted County, Minnesota, between January 1, 1985, through December 31, 2010, were retrieved from the Rochester Epidemiology Project database. Transient global amnesia was defined clinically. End points were cerebrovascular event (stroke or transient ischemic attack), seizure, or cognitive impairment (mild cognitive impairment or dementia) during follow-up. End points were studied using Kaplan-Meier survival plots and log-rank test. Results A total of 221 patients with TGA were identified and 221 age- and sex-matched controls were included in the analysis. The mean duration of follow-up was 12 years in both groups (range, 0.07-29.93). Prevalence of vascular risk factors and history of seizures were similar between both groups. Previous migraine was more common in the TGA group (42 patients [19.1%] vs 12 patients [5.4%]; P<.001). There was no statistically significant difference between survival curves for the TGA group and the control group using time to any type of cerebrovascular event (log-rank P=.30), time to seizures event (log-rank P=.55), and time to cognitive impair event (log-rank P=.88) as end points. The TGA recurrence occurred in 5.4% of patients after a median interval of 4.21 years (interquartile range, 2.82-8.44). Modified Rankin scale and death rates at last follow-up were also similar between both groups. Conclusion Our findings indicate that having an episode of TGA does not increase the risk of subsequent cerebrovascular events, seizures, or cognitive impairment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-405
Number of pages7
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume92
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

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Transient Global Amnesia
Seizures
Population
Survival
Transient Ischemic Attack
Migraine Disorders
Dementia
Epidemiology
Stroke
Databases
Recurrence
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Long-Term Outcome in Patients With Transient Global Amnesia : A Population-Based Study. / Arena, Julieta E.; Brown, Robert D Jr.; Mandrekar, Jayawant; Rabinstein, Alejandro.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 92, No. 3, 01.03.2017, p. 399-405.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective To study the long-term risk of cerebrovascular events, seizures, and cognitive impairment in patients with transient global amnesia (TGA). Patients and Methods Data for all patients diagnosed with possible TGA in Olmsted County, Minnesota, between January 1, 1985, through December 31, 2010, were retrieved from the Rochester Epidemiology Project database. Transient global amnesia was defined clinically. End points were cerebrovascular event (stroke or transient ischemic attack), seizure, or cognitive impairment (mild cognitive impairment or dementia) during follow-up. End points were studied using Kaplan-Meier survival plots and log-rank test. Results A total of 221 patients with TGA were identified and 221 age- and sex-matched controls were included in the analysis. The mean duration of follow-up was 12 years in both groups (range, 0.07-29.93). Prevalence of vascular risk factors and history of seizures were similar between both groups. Previous migraine was more common in the TGA group (42 patients [19.1{\%}] vs 12 patients [5.4{\%}]; P<.001). There was no statistically significant difference between survival curves for the TGA group and the control group using time to any type of cerebrovascular event (log-rank P=.30), time to seizures event (log-rank P=.55), and time to cognitive impair event (log-rank P=.88) as end points. The TGA recurrence occurred in 5.4{\%} of patients after a median interval of 4.21 years (interquartile range, 2.82-8.44). Modified Rankin scale and death rates at last follow-up were also similar between both groups. Conclusion Our findings indicate that having an episode of TGA does not increase the risk of subsequent cerebrovascular events, seizures, or cognitive impairment.",
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N2 - Objective To study the long-term risk of cerebrovascular events, seizures, and cognitive impairment in patients with transient global amnesia (TGA). Patients and Methods Data for all patients diagnosed with possible TGA in Olmsted County, Minnesota, between January 1, 1985, through December 31, 2010, were retrieved from the Rochester Epidemiology Project database. Transient global amnesia was defined clinically. End points were cerebrovascular event (stroke or transient ischemic attack), seizure, or cognitive impairment (mild cognitive impairment or dementia) during follow-up. End points were studied using Kaplan-Meier survival plots and log-rank test. Results A total of 221 patients with TGA were identified and 221 age- and sex-matched controls were included in the analysis. The mean duration of follow-up was 12 years in both groups (range, 0.07-29.93). Prevalence of vascular risk factors and history of seizures were similar between both groups. Previous migraine was more common in the TGA group (42 patients [19.1%] vs 12 patients [5.4%]; P<.001). There was no statistically significant difference between survival curves for the TGA group and the control group using time to any type of cerebrovascular event (log-rank P=.30), time to seizures event (log-rank P=.55), and time to cognitive impair event (log-rank P=.88) as end points. The TGA recurrence occurred in 5.4% of patients after a median interval of 4.21 years (interquartile range, 2.82-8.44). Modified Rankin scale and death rates at last follow-up were also similar between both groups. Conclusion Our findings indicate that having an episode of TGA does not increase the risk of subsequent cerebrovascular events, seizures, or cognitive impairment.

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