Liver transplantation: When to say yes or no? Based on a case report

Manuel Moreno Gonzales, William Sanchez, Timucin Taner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Liver transplantation (LT) is the gold standard therapy for end-stage liver diseases (ESLD) worldwide. Over the past decades, multiple strategies have been developed in order to optimize allograft/recipient outcomes and decrease patient morbidity/mortality. However, maintaining an appropriate balance between “using a limited resource” (i.e. available organs) and “reducing waitlist mortality” arises multiple ethical concerns. Aim: In this report we aimed to address some ethical issues related to a case that occurred in our institution in which liver re-transplantation was performed in a patient with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as an emergent life-saving therapy. Conclusions: We conclude that expanding the donor pool (e.g. living donor LT, use of extended criteria donors, donation after cardiac death, bridging therapies to delay the necessity of transplantation) is a way to compensate the growing discrepancy between donors and recipients; however, this needs to be evaluated in each individual patient in order to obtain the maximum benefit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number100027
JournalTransplantation Reports
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019

Fingerprint

Liver Transplantation
Tissue Donors
End Stage Liver Disease
Mortality
Living Donors
Ethics
Allografts
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Fibrosis
Therapeutics
Transplantation
Morbidity

Keywords

  • Hepatocellular carcinoma
  • Liver transplantation
  • Metastasis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Liver transplantation : When to say yes or no? Based on a case report. / Moreno Gonzales, Manuel; Sanchez, William; Taner, Timucin.

In: Transplantation Reports, Vol. 4, No. 2, 100027, 01.06.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moreno Gonzales, Manuel ; Sanchez, William ; Taner, Timucin. / Liver transplantation : When to say yes or no? Based on a case report. In: Transplantation Reports. 2019 ; Vol. 4, No. 2.
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