Liver iron stores in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

S. F. Dinneen, J. D. Silverberg, K. P. Batts, P. C. O'Brien, D. J. Ballard, R. A. Rizza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Iron overload such as that in idiopathic hemochromatosis is a well-established, albeit rare, cause of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Most patients with NIDDM have no recognized cause of their disease. Investigators have proposed that subclinical iron overload may cause diabetes mellitus in a substantial number of patients with NIDDM. Objective: The aim of the current study was to evaluate hepatic iron stores in autopsy specimens from a group of community residents with NIDDM. Methods: Fifteen patients with NIDDM and 17 age-matched control subjects were identified from a review of medical records of deceased residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota. Formalin-fixed liver tissue was analyzed for iron concentration by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and distribution of hepatic iron was determined histochemically. Results: No significant difference was found in either the distribution or the mean amount of hepatic iron between the diabetic and the control group (1,303 versus 1,349 μg Fe/g dry weight; P = 0.87). Thus, the mean difference was -46 μg Fe/g dry weight (confidence interval, -631 to 540). Conclusion: Because hepatic iron quantification is the definitive means of assessing total body iron stores, our results suggest that NIDDM is typically not associated with a substantial level of iron overload.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-15
Number of pages3
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume69
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1994

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Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Iron
Iron Overload
Liver
Weights and Measures
Atomic Spectrophotometry
Hemochromatosis
Formaldehyde
Medical Records
Autopsy
Diabetes Mellitus
Research Personnel
Confidence Intervals
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dinneen, S. F., Silverberg, J. D., Batts, K. P., O'Brien, P. C., Ballard, D. J., & Rizza, R. A. (1994). Liver iron stores in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 69(1), 13-15.

Liver iron stores in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. / Dinneen, S. F.; Silverberg, J. D.; Batts, K. P.; O'Brien, P. C.; Ballard, D. J.; Rizza, R. A.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 69, No. 1, 1994, p. 13-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dinneen, SF, Silverberg, JD, Batts, KP, O'Brien, PC, Ballard, DJ & Rizza, RA 1994, 'Liver iron stores in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus', Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 69, no. 1, pp. 13-15.
Dinneen SF, Silverberg JD, Batts KP, O'Brien PC, Ballard DJ, Rizza RA. Liver iron stores in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1994;69(1):13-15.
Dinneen, S. F. ; Silverberg, J. D. ; Batts, K. P. ; O'Brien, P. C. ; Ballard, D. J. ; Rizza, R. A. / Liver iron stores in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1994 ; Vol. 69, No. 1. pp. 13-15.
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