Linear mixed effects models.

Ann L Oberg, Douglas W. Mahoney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Statistical models provide a framework in which to describe the biological process giving rise to the data of interest. The construction of this model requires balancing adequate representation of the process with simplicity. Experiments involving multiple (correlated) observations per subject do not satisfy the assumption of independence required for most methods described in previous chapters. In some experiments, the amount of random variation differs between experimental groups. In other experiments, there are multiple sources of variability, such as both between-subject variation and technical variation. As demonstrated in this chapter, linear mixed effects models provide a versatile and powerful framework in which to address research objectives efficiently and appropriately.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-234
Number of pages22
JournalMethods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
Volume404
StatePublished - 2007

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Biological Phenomena
Statistical Models
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Linear mixed effects models. / Oberg, Ann L; Mahoney, Douglas W.

In: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), Vol. 404, 2007, p. 213-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oberg, Ann L ; Mahoney, Douglas W. / Linear mixed effects models. In: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.). 2007 ; Vol. 404. pp. 213-234.
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