Limited (6-h) ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a valid replacement for the office blood pressure by trained nurse clinician in the diagnosis of hypertension

John W. Graves, Carol A. Nash, Diane E. Grill, Kent R Bailey, Sheldon G. Sheps

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the ability of limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring as a valid replacement for office blood pressure measurement done to American Heart Association criteria in diagnosing hypertension. Methods: In all, 105 adults, who had been referred for limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, participated in the study. Limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring consisted of 6 h of blood pressure measurement while ambulatory at the Mayo Clinic, using a SpaceLabs 90207 (SpaceLabs Medical, Issaquah, Washington, USA) collecting six readings per hour for the period of observation. The study participants gave consent for three additional consecutive office blood pressure measurements, using a validated aneroid device, done to American Heart Association criteria, by a single hypertension nurse specialist. Results: Mean systolic blood pressure by limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was 137.9 ± 14.2 mmHg and for the nurse, 137.9 ± 20.1 mmHg. Mean diastolic blood pressure by limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was 81.5 ± 9.7 mmHg and for the nurse, 74.3 ± 11.9 mmHg. The intermethod difference for systolic blood pressure was 0.03 ± 12.5 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure, -7.2 ± 8.0 mmHg. Using <140/90 as criteria factor, limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and the trained nurse agreed 77% of the time on whether the patient was hypertensive. This agreement increased to 81% if the participant's referral blood pressure was ≥140/90. Conclusions: Limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is an excellent replacement for office blood pressure, done to American Heart Association criteria, in diagnosing hypertension. This avoids issues of variability introduced by the observers, such as digit preference and bias, and increases reproducibility of blood pressure measurements. The appropriate normal value for limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is <140/90 mmHg compared with <135/85 mmHg used in 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)169-174
Number of pages6
JournalBlood Pressure Monitoring
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2005

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Nurse Clinicians
Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Nurses

Keywords

  • Ambulatory blood pressure
  • Blood pressure measurement
  • Decision-making in hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Limited (6-h) ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a valid replacement for the office blood pressure by trained nurse clinician in the diagnosis of hypertension. / Graves, John W.; Nash, Carol A.; Grill, Diane E.; Bailey, Kent R; Sheps, Sheldon G.

In: Blood Pressure Monitoring, Vol. 10, No. 4, 08.2005, p. 169-174.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To assess the ability of limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring as a valid replacement for office blood pressure measurement done to American Heart Association criteria in diagnosing hypertension. Methods: In all, 105 adults, who had been referred for limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, participated in the study. Limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring consisted of 6 h of blood pressure measurement while ambulatory at the Mayo Clinic, using a SpaceLabs 90207 (SpaceLabs Medical, Issaquah, Washington, USA) collecting six readings per hour for the period of observation. The study participants gave consent for three additional consecutive office blood pressure measurements, using a validated aneroid device, done to American Heart Association criteria, by a single hypertension nurse specialist. Results: Mean systolic blood pressure by limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was 137.9 ± 14.2 mmHg and for the nurse, 137.9 ± 20.1 mmHg. Mean diastolic blood pressure by limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was 81.5 ± 9.7 mmHg and for the nurse, 74.3 ± 11.9 mmHg. The intermethod difference for systolic blood pressure was 0.03 ± 12.5 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure, -7.2 ± 8.0 mmHg. Using <140/90 as criteria factor, limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and the trained nurse agreed 77{\%} of the time on whether the patient was hypertensive. This agreement increased to 81{\%} if the participant's referral blood pressure was ≥140/90. Conclusions: Limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is an excellent replacement for office blood pressure, done to American Heart Association criteria, in diagnosing hypertension. This avoids issues of variability introduced by the observers, such as digit preference and bias, and increases reproducibility of blood pressure measurements. The appropriate normal value for limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is <140/90 mmHg compared with <135/85 mmHg used in 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.",
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AB - Objective: To assess the ability of limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring as a valid replacement for office blood pressure measurement done to American Heart Association criteria in diagnosing hypertension. Methods: In all, 105 adults, who had been referred for limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, participated in the study. Limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring consisted of 6 h of blood pressure measurement while ambulatory at the Mayo Clinic, using a SpaceLabs 90207 (SpaceLabs Medical, Issaquah, Washington, USA) collecting six readings per hour for the period of observation. The study participants gave consent for three additional consecutive office blood pressure measurements, using a validated aneroid device, done to American Heart Association criteria, by a single hypertension nurse specialist. Results: Mean systolic blood pressure by limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was 137.9 ± 14.2 mmHg and for the nurse, 137.9 ± 20.1 mmHg. Mean diastolic blood pressure by limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was 81.5 ± 9.7 mmHg and for the nurse, 74.3 ± 11.9 mmHg. The intermethod difference for systolic blood pressure was 0.03 ± 12.5 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure, -7.2 ± 8.0 mmHg. Using <140/90 as criteria factor, limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and the trained nurse agreed 77% of the time on whether the patient was hypertensive. This agreement increased to 81% if the participant's referral blood pressure was ≥140/90. Conclusions: Limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is an excellent replacement for office blood pressure, done to American Heart Association criteria, in diagnosing hypertension. This avoids issues of variability introduced by the observers, such as digit preference and bias, and increases reproducibility of blood pressure measurements. The appropriate normal value for limited ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is <140/90 mmHg compared with <135/85 mmHg used in 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

KW - Ambulatory blood pressure

KW - Blood pressure measurement

KW - Decision-making in hypertension

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