Limitations of estimating glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine in the general population

Andrew D Rule, Richard J. Rodeheffer, Timothy S. Larson, John C Jr. Burnett, Fernando G Cosio, Stephen T Turner, Steven J. Jacobsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To compare estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) In the general population on the basis of equations derived from different subsets of the general population. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Admits (ages ≥45 years) were randomly selected from 1997 to 2000 from the Olmsted County, Minnesota, population and had their serum creatinine levels measured. The GFR was estimated using previously reported equations derived tram a sample of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), a sample of healthy persons, and the combined samples. Serum creatinine was measured with the same assay used to derive these equations. RESULTS: Of 4203 subjects, 2042 (47% participation rate) were enrolled and studied. Serum samples from 1982 subjects were used to measure creatinine ievels. The prevalence of a reduced estimated GFR (<60 mL/min per 1.73 m2) was 12% (95% confidence Interval [CI], 10%-13%) based on an equation derived with all CKd patients, and this finding was similar to prior reports. However, the prevalence of a reduced estimated GFR was 5.7% (95% CI, 4.8%-6.8%) based on an equation derived with both CKD patients and healthy persons and 0.2% (95% CE, 0.1%-0.5%) based on an equation derived with all healthy persons. Women had a higher risk of reduced estimated GFR according to an equation derived with all CKD patients, but men had a higher risk with an equation derived with both CKD patients and healthy persons. CONCLUSION: The use of serum creatinine to diagnose CKD requires a different approach (eg, normal value study) from the use of serum creatinine to estimate GFR once the diagnosis of CKD has been made.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1427-1434
Number of pages8
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume81
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

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Glomerular Filtration Rate
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Creatinine
Serum
Population
Confidence Intervals
Reference Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Limitations of estimating glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine in the general population. / Rule, Andrew D; Rodeheffer, Richard J.; Larson, Timothy S.; Burnett, John C Jr.; Cosio, Fernando G; Turner, Stephen T; Jacobsen, Steven J.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 81, No. 11, 2006, p. 1427-1434.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rule, Andrew D ; Rodeheffer, Richard J. ; Larson, Timothy S. ; Burnett, John C Jr. ; Cosio, Fernando G ; Turner, Stephen T ; Jacobsen, Steven J. / Limitations of estimating glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine in the general population. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2006 ; Vol. 81, No. 11. pp. 1427-1434.
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