Lifetime fracture risk: An approach to hip fracture risk assessment based on bone mineral density and age

L. Joseph^Melton, Stephen H. Kan, Heinz W. Wahner, B. Lawrence Riggs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

190 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hip fractures occur late in life following a substantial reduction in skeletal mass. If risk for such fractures could be predicted early, efforts to prevent excessive bone loss would be more successful and could be directed at the individuals most likely to be affected. With this objective in mind, we devised an approach to estimating the lifetime risk of a proximal femur fracture based on age and on current femoral bone mineral density, using population-based data from ongoing studies of osteoporosis and fractures among Rochester, Minnesota, women. Our calculations indicate that, at any given age, the lifetime risk of a proximal femur fracture rises as current bone density diminishes. At any given level of femoral bone density, lifetime risk rises with younger age and increasing life expectancy. While these trends seem robust, estimates of risk vary substantially with the assumptions that underlie the model. Consequently, these assumptions must be validated before our findings can be applied clinically to predict risk for individual patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)985-994
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume41
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 1988

Keywords

  • Bone mineral density
  • Epidemiology
  • Hip fracture
  • Incidence
  • Lifetime
  • Osteoporosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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