Lichenoid dermatitis in three patients with metastatic melanoma treated with anti-PD-1 therapy

Richard W Joseph, Mark Cappel, Brent Goedjen, Matthew Gordon, Brandon Kirsch, Cheryl Gilstrap, Sanjay Bagaria, Anokhi Jambusaria-Pahlajani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Therapies that activate the immune system through blocking the binding of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) present on tumors and PD-1 (programmed death 1) present on activated immune cells are revolutionizing the care for patients with cancer. These therapies work by inhibiting negative regulators of the immune system, thereby decreasing a tumor's ability to evade the immune system. The side effects of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapies are generally mild and as expected are related to autoimmune reactions. Two of the most common side effects of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapies are rash and pruritus occurring in approximately 20% of patients. Although the rash is generally recognized to be immune mediated, the exact mechanisms of the rash remain unclear. Herein, we report three cases of lichenoid dermatitis in three patients treated with MK-3475 (anti-PD-1) that were characterized with marked T-cell infiltrates with few PD-1-positive cells. The rashes in all three patients were relatively mild, allowing treatment to continue despite the rashes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-22
Number of pages5
JournalCancer immunology research
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Dermatitis
Melanoma
Exanthema
Immune System
Therapeutics
Ligands
Neoplasms
Pruritus
Patient Care
T-Lymphocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Joseph, R. W., Cappel, M., Goedjen, B., Gordon, M., Kirsch, B., Gilstrap, C., ... Jambusaria-Pahlajani, A. (2015). Lichenoid dermatitis in three patients with metastatic melanoma treated with anti-PD-1 therapy. Cancer immunology research, 3(1), 18-22. https://doi.org/10.1158/2326-6066.CIR-14-0134

Lichenoid dermatitis in three patients with metastatic melanoma treated with anti-PD-1 therapy. / Joseph, Richard W; Cappel, Mark; Goedjen, Brent; Gordon, Matthew; Kirsch, Brandon; Gilstrap, Cheryl; Bagaria, Sanjay; Jambusaria-Pahlajani, Anokhi.

In: Cancer immunology research, Vol. 3, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 18-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Joseph, RW, Cappel, M, Goedjen, B, Gordon, M, Kirsch, B, Gilstrap, C, Bagaria, S & Jambusaria-Pahlajani, A 2015, 'Lichenoid dermatitis in three patients with metastatic melanoma treated with anti-PD-1 therapy', Cancer immunology research, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 18-22. https://doi.org/10.1158/2326-6066.CIR-14-0134
Joseph, Richard W ; Cappel, Mark ; Goedjen, Brent ; Gordon, Matthew ; Kirsch, Brandon ; Gilstrap, Cheryl ; Bagaria, Sanjay ; Jambusaria-Pahlajani, Anokhi. / Lichenoid dermatitis in three patients with metastatic melanoma treated with anti-PD-1 therapy. In: Cancer immunology research. 2015 ; Vol. 3, No. 1. pp. 18-22.
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