Leisure-time physical activity sustained since midlife and preservation of cognitive function: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

Priya Palta, A. Richey Sharrett, Jennifer A. Deal, Kelly R. Evenson, Kelley Pettee Gabriel, Aaron R. Folsom, Alden L. Gross, B. Gwen Windham, David Knopman, Thomas H. Mosley, Gerardo Heiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: We tested the hypotheses that higher levels of and persistence of midlife leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) are associated long-term with lower cognitive decline and less incident dementia. Methods: A total of 10,705 participants (mean age: 60 years) had LTPA (no, low, middle, or high) measured in 1987-1989 and 1993-1995. LTPA was assessed in relation to incident dementia and 14-year change in general cognitive performance. Results: Over a median follow-up of 17.4 years, 1063 dementia cases were observed. Compared with no LTPA, high LTPA in midlife was associated with lower incidence of dementia (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 0.71 [0.61, 0.86]) and lower declines in general cognitive performance (−0.07 standard deviation difference [−0.12 to −0.04]). These associations were stronger when measured against persistence of midlife LTPA over 6 years. Discussion: LTPA is a readily modifiable factor associated inversely with long-term dementia incidence and cognitive decline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-281
Number of pages9
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2019

Keywords

  • Cognitive decline
  • Cohort study
  • Dementia
  • Epidemiology
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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    Palta, P., Sharrett, A. R., Deal, J. A., Evenson, K. R., Gabriel, K. P., Folsom, A. R., Gross, A. L., Windham, B. G., Knopman, D., Mosley, T. H., & Heiss, G. (2019). Leisure-time physical activity sustained since midlife and preservation of cognitive function: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Alzheimer's and Dementia, 15(2), 273-281. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2018.08.008