Leisure-time physical activity sustained since midlife and preservation of cognitive function: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

Priya Palta, A. Richey Sharrett, Jennifer A. Deal, Kelly R. Evenson, Kelley Pettee Gabriel, Aaron R. Folsom, Alden L. Gross, B. Gwen Windham, David S Knopman, Thomas H. Mosley, Gerardo Heiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: We tested the hypotheses that higher levels of and persistence of midlife leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) are associated long-term with lower cognitive decline and less incident dementia. Methods: A total of 10,705 participants (mean age: 60 years) had LTPA (no, low, middle, or high) measured in 1987-1989 and 1993-1995. LTPA was assessed in relation to incident dementia and 14-year change in general cognitive performance. Results: Over a median follow-up of 17.4 years, 1063 dementia cases were observed. Compared with no LTPA, high LTPA in midlife was associated with lower incidence of dementia (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 0.71 [0.61, 0.86]) and lower declines in general cognitive performance (−0.07 standard deviation difference [−0.12 to −0.04]). These associations were stronger when measured against persistence of midlife LTPA over 6 years. Discussion: LTPA is a readily modifiable factor associated inversely with long-term dementia incidence and cognitive decline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Leisure Activities
Cognition
Atherosclerosis
Dementia
Incidence
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • Cognitive decline
  • Cohort study
  • Dementia
  • Epidemiology
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Leisure-time physical activity sustained since midlife and preservation of cognitive function : The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. / Palta, Priya; Sharrett, A. Richey; Deal, Jennifer A.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Gabriel, Kelley Pettee; Folsom, Aaron R.; Gross, Alden L.; Windham, B. Gwen; Knopman, David S; Mosley, Thomas H.; Heiss, Gerardo.

In: Alzheimer's and Dementia, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Palta, Priya ; Sharrett, A. Richey ; Deal, Jennifer A. ; Evenson, Kelly R. ; Gabriel, Kelley Pettee ; Folsom, Aaron R. ; Gross, Alden L. ; Windham, B. Gwen ; Knopman, David S ; Mosley, Thomas H. ; Heiss, Gerardo. / Leisure-time physical activity sustained since midlife and preservation of cognitive function : The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. In: Alzheimer's and Dementia. 2018.
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AU - Gross, Alden L.

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