Learning the Thyroid Examination - A Multimodality Intervention for Internal Medicine Residents

William A. Houck, Cacia V. Soares-Welch, Victor Manuel Montori, J. T C Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Many physicians have inadequate physical diagnosis skills and cannot detect thyroid abnormalities on physical examination. Purpose: To evaluate a multimodality intervention to improve thyroid examination skills using a prospective controlled trial in first-year residents enrolled in an academic internal medicine program. Methods: The intervention group received a 60-minute educational session during which an endocrinologist described anatomical landmarks, thyroid abnormalities, and examination techniques using a slide show, computerized animation, videotape, and live demonstration on a volunteer with goiter. Residents examined a normal and a goitrous thyroid under the observation of a preceptor and received an evidence-based handout on the thyroid examination. The control group received no specific intervention. Examination technique and identification of thyroid abnormalities were blindly assessed in 2 stations of an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Results: Of the 19 residents in the intervention group and the 20 in the control group, 6 (32%) and 3 (15%), respectively, observed the neck for thyroid abnormalities (P = 0.3), 17 (90%) and 16 (80%) used proper hand position (P = 0.7), and 13 (68%) and 15 (75%) had the patient swallow while the neck was palpated (P = 0.7). There was a significant difference in the mean scores based on thyroid physical findings during the OSCE between the intervention and control groups (100 vs. 52.5 [maximal possible score = 200], P = 0.047). Conclusion: A 1-hour multimodality learning session furthered the ability of first-year internal medicine residents to detect thyroid abnormalities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-28
Number of pages5
JournalTeaching and Learning in Medicine
Volume14
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 2002

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multimodality
Internal Medicine
Thyroid Gland
Learning
medicine
resident
examination
learning
Group
Control Groups
Neck
Videotape Recording
Aptitude
Goiter
Deglutition
physician
Physical Examination
Volunteers
Hand
Observation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Learning the Thyroid Examination - A Multimodality Intervention for Internal Medicine Residents. / Houck, William A.; Soares-Welch, Cacia V.; Montori, Victor Manuel; Li, J. T C.

In: Teaching and Learning in Medicine, Vol. 14, No. 1, 12.2002, p. 24-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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