Latiglutenase Improves Symptoms in Seropositive Celiac Disease Patients While on a Gluten-Free Diet

Jack A. Syage, Joseph A Murray, Peter H.R. Green, Chaitan Khosla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Aims: Celiac disease (CD) is a widespread condition triggered by dietary gluten and treated with a lifelong gluten-free diet (GFD); however, inadvertent exposure to gluten can result in episodic symptoms. A previous trial of latiglutenase (clinicaltrials.gov; NCT01917630), an orally administered mixture of two recombinant gluten-specific proteases, was undertaken in symptomatic subjects with persistent injury. The primary endpoint for histologic improvement was not met, presumably due to a trial effect. In this post hoc analysis, we investigated the efficacy of latiglutenase for reducing symptoms in subgroups of the study participants based on their seropositivity. Methods: The study involved symptomatic CD patients following a GFD for at least one year prior to randomization. Patients were treated for 12 weeks with latiglutenase or placebo. Of 398 completed patients, 173 (43%) were seropositive at baseline. Symptoms were recorded daily, and weekly symptom scores were compiled. p values were calculated by analysis of covariance. Results: A statistically significant, dose-dependent reduction was detected in the severity and frequency of symptoms in seropositive but not seronegative patients. The severity of abdominal pain and bloating was reduced by 58 and 44%, respectively, in the cohort receiving the highest latiglutenase dose (900 mg, n = 14) relative to placebo (n = 54). Symptom improvement increased from week 6 to week 12. There was also a trend toward greater symptom improvement with greater baseline symptom severity. Conclusions: Seropositive CD patients show symptomatic improvement from latiglutenase taken with meals and would benefit from the availability of this treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2428-2432
Number of pages5
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
Volume62
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Fingerprint

Gluten-Free Diet
Celiac Disease
Glutens
Placebos
Random Allocation
Abdominal Pain
Meals
Peptide Hydrolases
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Celiac disease
  • Latiglutenase
  • Symptoms
  • Therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Latiglutenase Improves Symptoms in Seropositive Celiac Disease Patients While on a Gluten-Free Diet. / Syage, Jack A.; Murray, Joseph A; Green, Peter H.R.; Khosla, Chaitan.

In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, Vol. 62, No. 9, 01.09.2017, p. 2428-2432.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Syage, Jack A. ; Murray, Joseph A ; Green, Peter H.R. ; Khosla, Chaitan. / Latiglutenase Improves Symptoms in Seropositive Celiac Disease Patients While on a Gluten-Free Diet. In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences. 2017 ; Vol. 62, No. 9. pp. 2428-2432.
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