Large cell carcinoma of the lung: Results of resection for a cure

R. J. Downey, S. Asakura, C. Deschamps, T. V. Colby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The effectiveness of surgical resection of large cell undifferentiated carcinoma of the lung remains poorly defined because of the histology's relatively low frequency, the tendency for presentation with high-stage disease, and the failure in most published series to separate large cell carcinomas from the other variants of non-small cell lung carcinoma. To define the effectiveness of surgical treatment of large cell carcinoma, we reviewed the Mayo Clinic experience over a 5-year period. Methods: We have retrospectively reviewed the Mayo Clinic experience with 61 patients with large cell carcinoma and 17 patients with adenocarcinoma with focal mucin production who came to surgical resection during the 5-year period of January 1, 1982, through December 31, 1986. Results: One-hundred percent 5-year follow-up was obtained. For the 61 patients with large cell carcinoma, the overall 5-year survival was 37%. Five-year survival for those with stage I tumors was 58% (n = 31), stage II 33% (n = 6), stage IIIA 15% (n = 20), stage HIB 0% (n = 2), and stage IV 0% (n = 2). No significant differences in survival were detected between the 61 patients with large cell carcinoma and the 17 patients with solid adenocarcinoma with mucin production. Conclusions: Our results suggest that there is a subset of patients with large cell carcinoma of the lung who can undergo resection with a reasonable expectation of long-term survival and that this survival is, stage for stage, comparable to or only slightly less than that achieved with other non-small cell lung carcinomas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)599-604
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume117
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Large Cell Carcinoma
Lung
Survival
Mucins
Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Adenocarcinoma
Histology
Carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Downey, R. J., Asakura, S., Deschamps, C., & Colby, T. V. (1999). Large cell carcinoma of the lung: Results of resection for a cure. Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 117(3), 599-604.

Large cell carcinoma of the lung : Results of resection for a cure. / Downey, R. J.; Asakura, S.; Deschamps, C.; Colby, T. V.

In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 117, No. 3, 1999, p. 599-604.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Downey, RJ, Asakura, S, Deschamps, C & Colby, TV 1999, 'Large cell carcinoma of the lung: Results of resection for a cure', Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, vol. 117, no. 3, pp. 599-604.
Downey, R. J. ; Asakura, S. ; Deschamps, C. ; Colby, T. V. / Large cell carcinoma of the lung : Results of resection for a cure. In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 1999 ; Vol. 117, No. 3. pp. 599-604.
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